Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Documentary Photography’

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

In Photography News on July 26, 2017 at 3:58 AM

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

This is a provocative image. I surmise in amongst multiple reasons it was chosen to be the winner was to – provoke. Creativeness, diversity, innovation, and vision in photography should be without boundaries – this is without question. This photograph goes some way to pushing the creative boundaries of photography. You know ‘Space the last frontier,’ go where no man (should be woman as well) has been before stuff boundaries!

                                          © Photograph by Artist Justine Varga

Winner of the Tweed Gallery’s $20,000 Olive Cotton Prize for photographic portraiture was a controversial choice by judge Shaune Lakin [Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra]. The photograph (above) is titled ‘Maternal Line’ and is by Justine Varga.

At this point, it is useful to ask a couple of questions; the first being, does this specific photograph succeed in doing that – being stellar? The second and more pragmatic for many here is the stinging question is, is this a portrait photograph? The answer to the first question lies with the individual viewer given the inbuilt subjectivity of photography itself. There is no x+y=z answer. The second question is also difficult to answer. It is though one needs first to ask what a portrait is? A portrait is defined as a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. No face, head or shoulders here? Though, more broadly a portrait is a representation or impression of someone or something in language or on film or television or in this case – photography. The latter is where we enter the twilight zone. It is plausible that this photograph ‘Maternal Line’ can loosely be defined as a portrait. I think especially because as I understand it, photographer Justine Varga lovingly collaborated with her grandmother in making it. It is a ‘representation’ of her grandmother, and representation can qualify as a portrait. In a very human way, I am touched by Varga’s collaboration with her grandmother in making ‘Maternal Line .’ Saying that I wonder if the final work is as compelling as the collaboration and methodology that produced it in the first place?
As mentioned earlier within the context of those ‘go where no man (or woman of course) has been before frontiers’ of photography; curators, judges, picture editors et al. at times could be more balanced in avoiding choosing photographs that are biased towards methodology and philosophical underpinnings. Yes, the methodology and philosophical underpinnings of a photograph are paramount but not at the expense of dumbing down the aesthetic, and emotion of a photograph. Equity of both methodology and aesthetic produces the most potent and powerful photographs. Any University first-year art photography student can write a three thousand word piece on why the close-up photograph of the wine stained piece of shag pile carpet s/he has photographed is ‘art’ with intellectual and philosophical justification and authority. This is basic 101 University art photography stuff. But the important question that needs to be asked is, is it an accomplishment as an aesthetically evolved and emotionally charged photograph? Does it question us and inform us, delight us and disturb us, make us laugh or cry, extend our understanding of what it is to be human and be part of humanity? Further, still, does it emotionally wound us and remind us what it is to be alive? I wonder? Perhaps in some way it does in a ‘quite’ way or is it that ‘the story’ of the methodology is more compelling in this case?
Could it be that the aesthetic of the ‘Maternal Line’ doesn’t equal the intellectual and philosophical maturity that went into making it? Perhaps this is at the core of the consternation concerning ‘Marternal Line’ winning the Olive Cotton award?
Provocative? Clearly so but at what cost? Generally put provocation at the cost of devolving an evolved aesthetic and emotion is narrow in vision and counterintuitive. Personally, am I provoked by the actual photograph? I I am emotionally moved when considering the intamacy and emotion surrounding the story of making the photograph. But and again, provoked by the actual photograph itself? No, a flat line. I don’t ‘feel’ anything, and that is a problem.

~ JP

External Link: ABC NEWS

External Link: Sydney Morning Herald

Advertisements

Student’s Work From Kathmandu 2011

In Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on April 1, 2017 at 7:04 AM

                                                                                                  © Photograph by Kevin Cooper

This video highlights the compelling photographs authored by participants’ who took part in our last Kathmandu Workshop, July 11-16, 2011.

View video here:

The participants who took part and whose work appears on this video include:

Susie Hagon
Narendra Mainali
Kevin Cooper
Bikash
Cim Sears
Kelly Mac
Nadia Janis
Kellie Lefranchi
Matt Dole
Kate Walton

What can you do?

Our upcoming workshop in Kathmandu is:  August 28th – September 1st, 2017 .

Join us for an unforgettable experience!

For further information please contact:

Stephen Dupont stephendupont1@mac.com  and/or Jack Picone jackvpicone@gmail.com

To register contact Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.comjackvpicone@gmail.com

Music Credit: Clap Hands from Rain Dogs by Tom Waits

Workshop In Motion – Upcoming Sept. 3rd-7th, 2017 Workshop in Kathmandu, Nepal.

In Ethics, Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion on March 31, 2017 at 10:36 AM

Stephen Dupont and Jack Picone give an overview of what to expect on our upcoming Sept. 2017 in Kathmandu, Nepal.                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

A young deceased woman (above) is carried to the burning ghats by family members at Pashupatinath Temple, Kathmandu.

View the short video here and be transported to the kaleidoscopic streets of Nepal.

~ Jack Picone

 

Siem Reap (Angkor) Workshop April 10th – 14th 2017

In Ethics, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap (Angkor) 

April 10th – 14th

Angkor Wat-faces of Bayon.

        Angkor Wat. Faces of Bayon.                                                  © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest growing town and the jumping off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

Award-winning documentary photographer and Reportage workshop founder Jack Picone (and  guest tutor to be announced)  will lead the workshop. Jack and will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

A young Muslim woman in the villiage of Loveathon. Oxfam has helped enhance the life of local residents in Loveathon like this young woman by providing fishing nets water fliters and mosquito nets.

                                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of Sunday, April 9th before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of Monday, April 10th. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening, Friday, April 14th.

Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns.

Cost: US$ 1,950. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Links: Jack Picone: http://www.jackpicone.com 

A Nation Continues To Mourn

In Random Moments on November 11, 2016 at 7:54 AM

jackpicone_king_reflection-lr-1

                                                                                                      Photograph by © Jack Picone

Above: A digital screen playing historical video of  King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand who died on 13 October 2016 after a long illness is reflected in rainwater near Bts Chong Nonsi, Bangkok.

The private sector has canceled all entertainment activities planned for the upcoming Loy Krathong, Christmas and New Year. Though the government has indicated that these activities can be resumed after the ending of the 30-day mourning period on November 14.

Fujifilm x/100s

In Street Photography on August 13, 2016 at 7:14 AM

Even though a reasonable amount of time has eclipsed since Fujifilm launched [2013] the x/100I still find myself imbued with it. It is intuitive to use, produces technically superb files and is discreet. Here is a link to a short video of me using it while in Burma or now as it is known Myanmar.

 

JackPicone_Burma_-Fuji-X100s-002

A mother cares for her son during a ferry crossing on the Irrawaddy River Yangon, Burma.                                                                                                                           

        Photograph by © Jack Picone

 

Turning The Tide

In Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 10:07 AM

Thailand’s village of Samut Chin: Turning the tide

The Thai village of Samut Chin is drowning in an invading sea, with little stopping the advancing destruction....read more

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-16

The local village shop acts as a meeting area for Ban Khun Samut Chin village community © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-17

The local village shop acts as a meeting area for Ban Khun Samut Chin village community © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-11

Bamboo breakwaters that were built several years ago to ‘break’ the power of the surf and protect Ban Khun Samut Chin village have only been partially successful. Submerged trees and mangrove saplings that have drowned in the advancing seawater are clearly visible. © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-32

Submerged telegraph poles tapering off into the distance. These poles act as visual markers for where Ban Khun Samut Chin village was located before it was claimed by the sea.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-31

Fishing and shrimp farming are the mainstays and principal sources of activity and income for Khun Samut Chin village. Even small rises in sea level throws out the delicate environmental balance of shrimp farming.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-14

 Fishermen motor out to sea past the breakwaters that were built several years ago in an effort to “break” the power of the surf and protect Ban Khun Samut Chin village © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-28

Three of the five monks remaining at Samut Trawat temple suspend Thai flags to poles along the entrance walkway.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-9

The principal Buddha statue at Wat Khun Samut Trawat faces the advancing sea.  © Jack Picone

 

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-34

At twilight, a resident Monk from Wat Khun Samut Trawat gazes out to sea and says, “That is where our village once was”.  © Jack Picone

~ Ends.

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

Reinterpretation

In Random Moments on February 27, 2016 at 4:35 AM

Interesting to see one of my iconic photographs [Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery] in a copy artists shop in central Bangkok being reinterpreted as a painting.

It is unfinished, and the artist was nowhere to be found. As a photographer, it is odd to see one of your photographs morphing into another medium. Odd — good — so far.

I am curious to enter into a dialogue with the artist and intrigued to see what it will look like when finished.

Exciting.

JackPicone_GHM_Painting-1                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone                       

        Above, work-in-progress painting of “Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery”.

 

 

Thai/Burma Border                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone   

        Above, the original black and white photograph made on the Thai-Burma border.

Random Street Portrait

In Random Moments on February 7, 2016 at 5:08 AM
JackPicone_Eyes-Head-LR-1

                                                                                         Photograph by © Jack Picone


The people you see on the way back from the launderette.‘You Need Eyes In The Back Of Your Head’.