Reportage

One to One Tuition Pre Xmas 10% discount (between Dec. 5th – 17th only)

In Workshop News on December 4, 2016 at 2:21 AM

One to One Tuition

Pre Xmas 10% discount (between Dec. 5th – 17th only).images

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One – to – one participant Sandy Edwards during her tuition in Bangkok © Photograph by Jack Picone.     

“Thank you for a wonderful, informative, learning, fun, Buddhist, photography week in Bangkok”.

~ Sandy Edwards

Join Jack Picone for one – to – one photography tuition designed to address your photographic needs! It will be an extraordinary experience!

Tuition Costs  $US445 per day & $US335 per half day

With discount: Now $US400.50 and US$301.50

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*Discounts apply for couples and groups and for sessions five days and longer.

*Concerning cost: Cost is below my day and half day rates that I bill editorial clients as a professional photographer. I have been working in excess of thirty years as a professional photographer for the world’s leading media publications. I have a Masters in Visual Arts and  a Ph.D. in Documentary Photography.  What I impart during one-to-one tutorials cannot be found on a YouTube video. What you take away is; knowledge that you will be able to apply over and over again to your own photography, elevating the aesthetic of your authored images – hyperbolically. 

Reportage Photography Workshops tutor Jack Picone delivers one-on-one tuition to individuals and groups (up to four) in Thailand and neighbouring Asian countries. One-to-one tuition is for people who are interested in fast-tracking their photographic skill and vision.

Tuition can be individually structured to accommodate photographers learning requirements.

Jack is a working photojournalist and documentary photographer with extensive experience as a photography educator.

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(Above and below) One-to-one participants at work in Bangkok’s urban slum area, Khlong Toei.

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Includes

On location shooting instruction, intensive post-shooting editing, critiquing, sequencing and basic Photoshop.

When?  

On a rolling basis 2016-2017. Book early to secure your ideal dates.

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(Above) Jeffrey Jue with local Nepalese photographer Sailendra Kharel, during a one – to – one tutorial in Kathmandu in Nepal.

Contact

To receive further information about one – to – one tuition or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for travel to Asia.

 

A Nation Continues To Mourn

In Random Moments on November 11, 2016 at 7:54 AM

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                                                                                                      Photograph by © Jack Picone

Above: A digital screen palying historical video of  King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand who died on 13 October 2016 after a long illness is reflected in rainwater near Bts Chong Nonsi, Bangkok.

The private sector has cancelled all entertainment activities planned for the upcoming Loy Krathong, Christmas and New Year. Though the government has indicated that these activities can be resumed after the ending of the 30-day mourning period on November 14.

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

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Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.