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Siem Reap | Angkor Wat | Workshop December 2019

In Photography, Photography News, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on August 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM

Siem Reap | Angkor Wat | Workshop December 2019

When: 7th – 11th December 2019

 On the way to school. Angkor Wat, Siem Reap © Photograph by Jack Picone

 

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest-growing town and the jumping-off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

Celebrated photographer, artist and filmmakerStephen Dupont and Documentary photographer  Jack Picone  will work in tandem to deliver an immersive, insightful and enriching learning experience.

The workshop’s schedule will be engaging, energising and highly rewarding.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of the 6th of Dec. before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of 7th of Dec. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced two weeks before the workshop to provide you with time to research possible topics before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo-essay with a striking visual narrative to be shown on the final evening of the workshop on Wednesday, Dec. 11th.

Stephen and Jack will hold one to one and group sessions to supervise, critique and edit participants assignments. Intensive dialogue is promoted on topics such as; photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work and how to hone your personal style.

Early evenings are peppered with lively discussions concerning the aesthetics, philosophy and politics underpinning photography as a medium and with digital projections of both Stephen’s and Jack’s work and other noteworthy photographers.

 

“Enterprising.” A girl draws to glean donations from tourists en route to temples. Siem Reap, Cambodia  © Photograph by Jack Picone

 

Cost: US$ 1,955. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $US500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Registration: To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Please Note: Siem Reap is a safe destination. That said and within a cautionary context, Reportage Workshops advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. 


 

References and Links:

Stephen Dupont

Website

Netflix

World Press Photo

Jack Picone

Website

YouTube 

Wikipedia

 

Aperture Photography Conference | April 2018

In Photography News on March 20, 2018 at 3:21 PM

Be part of Sydney’s first immersive weekend photography conference at the
International Convention Centre Sydney on 28-29th April 2018.Wat Prabat Nampu, Hospice for those living with AIDS. Lopburi, Thailand. 2004.

© Photograph by Jack Picone

Photograph made for the Positive Lives project.

Positive Lives was a unique international project that commissioned photographers to document the impact of HIV & AIDS around the world, illuminating positive human responses to this world crisis.

The project reflected the issues and emotions which confront people in their daily lives as they lived and worked with the disease. Issues of confidentiality, fear, prejudice, exclusion and survival, through to care, support, compassion, trust and openness were explored. Texts accompanied photographs authored based on the personal stories of individuals.

By sharing these moving stories the Positive Lives project aimed to challenge stigma and discrimination, and disrupt the myths and prejudices that surround people living with HIV & AIDS.

Positive Lives was a collaboration between photographers and a number of organisations, including Concern Worldwide and UK HIV charity, Terrence Higgins Trust. Concern has been at the forefront of community responses to HIV & AIDS and the fight for access to treatment since 1987. 

In her book ‘The Cruel Radiance: Photography and Political Violence’ when discussing the ethical and moral minefield associated with documentary and news photography, American writer Susie Linfield suggests that a good starting point is to consider the genres as “The beginning of a dialogue, the start of an investigation—into which we thoughtfully enter.”
Clearly, this photograph above is emotionally laden and for some will prove confronting. Many would object to it being made in the first place let alone viewing it subsequently. Conversely, some people would suggest that it was essential that documentary photographers make photographs like this one and communicate the inhumanity that often accompanies them. So why the polarization of opinion?
Join me and seven fellow Australian photographers speaking at Aperture Photography Conference 2018 in Sydney to understand more about the philosophies and politics underpinning a diversity of photography genres.
This is Aperture Australia’s first photography conference, and TV journalist and photographer Ray Martin is its host.
Live panel discussions will focus on how attendees can develop their skills, knowledge, and networking with first-hand experiences and tips from photographers.

My co-speakers include:
Ken Duncan, Australian landscape photographer
Alexia Sinclair, fine art photographer
Gary Heery, celebrity portrait photographer
Murray Fredericks, landscape photographer
Krystle Wright, adventure sports photographer
Eugene Tan, Aquabumps’ founder
Megan Lewis, Fujifilm X ambassador

More information here.

 Aperture Photography Conference.

 Short Video Overview

~ Jack Picone

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

In Photography News on July 26, 2017 at 3:58 AM

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

This is a provocative image. I surmise in amongst multiple reasons it was chosen to be the winner was to – provoke. Creativeness, diversity, innovation, and vision in photography should be without boundaries – this is without question. This photograph goes some way to pushing the creative boundaries of photography. You know ‘Space the last frontier,’ go where no man (should be woman as well) has been before stuff boundaries!

                                          © Photograph by Artist Justine Varga

Winner of the Tweed Gallery’s $20,000 Olive Cotton Prize for photographic portraiture was a controversial choice by judge Shaune Lakin [Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra]. The photograph (above) is titled ‘Maternal Line’ and is by Justine Varga.

At this point, it is useful to ask a couple of questions; the first being, does this specific photograph succeed in doing that – being stellar? The second and more pragmatic for many here is the stinging question is, is this a portrait photograph? The answer to the first question lies with the individual viewer given the inbuilt subjectivity of photography itself. There is no x+y=z answer. The second question is also difficult to answer. It is though one needs first to ask what a portrait is? A portrait is defined as a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. No face, head or shoulders here? Though, more broadly a portrait is a representation or impression of someone or something in language or on film or television or in this case – photography. The latter is where we enter the twilight zone. It is plausible that this photograph ‘Maternal Line’ can loosely be defined as a portrait. I think especially because as I understand it, photographer Justine Varga lovingly collaborated with her grandmother in making it. It is a ‘representation’ of her grandmother, and representation can qualify as a portrait. In a very human way, I am touched by Varga’s collaboration with her grandmother in making ‘Maternal Line .’ Saying that I wonder if the final work is as compelling as the collaboration and methodology that produced it in the first place?
As mentioned earlier within the context of those ‘go where no man (or woman of course) has been before frontiers’ of photography; curators, judges, picture editors et al. at times could be more balanced in avoiding choosing photographs that are biased towards methodology and philosophical underpinnings. Yes, the methodology and philosophical underpinnings of a photograph are paramount but not at the expense of dumbing down the aesthetic, and emotion of a photograph. Equity of both methodology and aesthetic produces the most potent and powerful photographs. Any University first-year art photography student can write a three thousand word piece on why the close-up photograph of the wine stained piece of shag pile carpet s/he has photographed is ‘art’ with intellectual and philosophical justification and authority. This is basic 101 University art photography stuff. But the important question that needs to be asked is, is it an accomplishment as an aesthetically evolved and emotionally charged photograph? Does it question us and inform us, delight us and disturb us, make us laugh or cry, extend our understanding of what it is to be human and be part of humanity? Further, still, does it emotionally wound us and remind us what it is to be alive? I wonder? Perhaps in some way it does in a ‘quite’ way or is it that ‘the story’ of the methodology is more compelling in this case?
Could it be that the aesthetic of the ‘Maternal Line’ doesn’t equal the intellectual and philosophical maturity that went into making it? Perhaps this is at the core of the consternation concerning ‘Marternal Line’ winning the Olive Cotton award?
Provocative? Clearly so but at what cost? Generally put provocation at the cost of devolving an evolved aesthetic and emotion is narrow in vision and counterintuitive. Personally, am I provoked by the actual photograph? I I am emotionally moved when considering the intamacy and emotion surrounding the story of making the photograph. But and again, provoked by the actual photograph itself? No, a flat line. I don’t ‘feel’ anything, and that is a problem.

~ JP

External Link: ABC NEWS

External Link: Sydney Morning Herald

Siem Reap | Angkor Wat | Workshop December 2019

In Photography, Photography News, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap | Angkor Wat | Workshop December 2019

When: 7th – 11 December 2019

 On the way to school. Angkor Wat, Siem Reap © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest-growing town and the jumping-off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

Celebrated photographer, artist and filmmaker Stephen Dupont and Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem to deliver an immersive, insightful and enriching learning experience. 

The workshop’s schedule will be engaging, energising and highly rewarding. 

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of the 6th of Dec. before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of 7th of Dec. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced two weeks before the workshop to provide you with time to research possible topics before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo-essay with a striking visual narrative to be shown on the final evening of the workshop on Wednesday, Dec. 11th.

Stephen and Jack will hold one to one and group sessions to supervise, critique and edit participants assignments. Intensive dialogue is promoted on topics such as; photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work and how to hone your personal style.

Early evenings are peppered with lively discussions concerning the aesthetics, philosophy and politics underpinning photography as a medium and with digital projections of both Stephen’s and Jack’s work and other noteworthy photographers.

 

“Enterprising.” A girl draws to glean donations from tourists en route to temples. Siem Reap, Cambodia  © Photograph by Jack Picone

 

Cost: US$ 1,955. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $US500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Registration: To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Please Note: Siem Reap is a safe destination. That said and within a cautionary context, Reportage Workshops advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. 


 

References and Links:

Stephen Dupont

Website

Netflix

World Press Photo

Jack Picone

Website

YouTube 

Wikipedia