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Posts Tagged ‘Workshop News’

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

In Photography News on July 26, 2017 at 3:58 AM

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

This is a provocative image. I surmise in amongst multiple reasons it was chosen to be the winner was to – provoke. Creativeness, diversity, innovation, and vision in photography should be without boundaries – this is without question. This photograph goes some way to pushing the creative boundaries of photography. You know ‘Space the last frontier,’ go where no man (should be woman as well) has been before stuff boundaries!

                                          © Photograph by Artist Justine Varga

Winner of the Tweed Gallery’s $20,000 Olive Cotton Prize for photographic portraiture was a controversial choice by judge Shaune Lakin [Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra]. The photograph (above) is titled ‘Maternal Line’ and is by Justine Varga.

At this point, it is useful to ask a couple of questions; the first being, does this specific photograph succeed in doing that – being stellar? The second and more pragmatic for many here is the stinging question is, is this a portrait photograph? The answer to the first question lies with the individual viewer given the inbuilt subjectivity of photography itself. There is no x+y=z answer. The second question is also difficult to answer. It is though one needs first to ask what a portrait is? A portrait is defined as a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. No face, head or shoulders here? Though, more broadly a portrait is a representation or impression of someone or something in language or on film or television or in this case – photography. The latter is where we enter the twilight zone. It is plausible that this photograph ‘Maternal Line’ can loosely be defined as a portrait. I think especially because as I understand it, photographer Justine Varga lovingly collaborated with her grandmother in making it. It is a ‘representation’ of her grandmother, and representation can qualify as a portrait. In a very human way, I am touched by Varga’s collaboration with her grandmother in making ‘Maternal Line .’ Saying that I wonder if the final work is as compelling as the collaboration and methodology that produced it in the first place?
As mentioned earlier within the context of those ‘go where no man (or woman of course) has been before frontiers’ of photography; curators, judges, picture editors et al. at times could be more balanced in avoiding choosing photographs that are biased towards methodology and philosophical underpinnings. Yes, the methodology and philosophical underpinnings of a photograph are paramount but not at the expense of dumbing down the aesthetic, and emotion of a photograph. Equity of both methodology and aesthetic produces the most potent and powerful photographs. Any University first-year art photography student can write a three thousand word piece on why the close-up photograph of the wine stained piece of shag pile carpet s/he has photographed is ‘art’ with intellectual and philosophical justification and authority. This is basic 101 University art photography stuff. But the important question that needs to be asked is, is it an accomplishment as an aesthetically evolved and emotionally charged photograph? Does it question us and inform us, delight us and disturb us, make us laugh or cry, extend our understanding of what it is to be human and be part of humanity? Further, still, does it emotionally wound us and remind us what it is to be alive? I wonder? Perhaps in some way it does in a ‘quite’ way or is it that ‘the story’ of the methodology is more compelling in this case?
Could it be that the aesthetic of the ‘Maternal Line’ doesn’t equal the intellectual and philosophical maturity that went into making it? Perhaps this is at the core of the consternation concerning ‘Marternal Line’ winning the Olive Cotton award?
Provocative? Clearly so but at what cost? Generally put provocation at the cost of devolving an evolved aesthetic and emotion is narrow in vision and counterintuitive. Personally, am I provoked by the actual photograph? I I am emotionally moved when considering the intamacy and emotion surrounding the story of making the photograph. But and again, provoked by the actual photograph itself? No, a flat line. I don’t ‘feel’ anything, and that is a problem.

~ JP

External Link: ABC NEWS

External Link: Sydney Morning Herald

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Student’s Work From Kathmandu 2011

In Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on April 1, 2017 at 7:04 AM

                                                                                                  © Photograph by Kevin Cooper

This video highlights the compelling photographs authored by participants’ who took part in our last Kathmandu Workshop, July 11-16, 2011.

View video here:

The participants who took part and whose work appears on this video include:

Susie Hagon
Narendra Mainali
Kevin Cooper
Bikash
Cim Sears
Kelly Mac
Nadia Janis
Kellie Lefranchi
Matt Dole
Kate Walton

What can you do?

Our upcoming workshop in Kathmandu is:  August 28th – September 1st, 2017 .

Join us for an unforgettable experience!

For further information please contact:

Stephen Dupont stephendupont1@mac.com  and/or Jack Picone jackvpicone@gmail.com

To register contact Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.comjackvpicone@gmail.com

Music Credit: Clap Hands from Rain Dogs by Tom Waits

Workshop In Motion – Upcoming Sept. 3rd-7th, 2017 Workshop in Kathmandu, Nepal.

In Ethics, Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion on March 31, 2017 at 10:36 AM

Stephen Dupont and Jack Picone give an overview of what to expect on our upcoming Sept. 2017 in Kathmandu, Nepal.                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

A young deceased woman (above) is carried to the burning ghats by family members at Pashupatinath Temple, Kathmandu.

View the short video here and be transported to the kaleidoscopic streets of Nepal.

~ Jack Picone

 

Sebastiao Salgado “The World Through His Eyes,” Exhibition In Bangkok

In Photography News on February 26, 2017 at 5:16 AM

If you happen to be in Bangkok at the moment, the venerable Brazilian documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado has an exhibition at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre. It opened Feb. 9, 2017. Salgado is probably one of the most ethical and environmentally conscious contemporary photographers practicing in the world today.
The exhibition is titled “Sebastiao Salgado: The World Through His Eyes,” The expansive exhibition of 120 black-and-white images by Salgado at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre is Salgado’s first major exhibition in Thailand and will open to the public until March 8.
In parts, the work is both deeply moving and inspirational.
Paradoxically, No Photographs are allowed in the actual gallery space itself?

~Jack Picone

jackpicone_salgado_exhibition-lr-1A security guard enforces, “No Photo” dictate at  Salgado exhibition. © Photograph by Jack Picone

One to One Tuition 10% discount (between 1st – 31st March, 2017 only)

In Workshop News on December 4, 2016 at 2:21 AM

One to One Tuition

10% discount (between 1st – 31st March 2017).

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One – to – one participant Sandy Edwards during her tuition in Bangkok © Photograph by Jack Picone.     

“Thank you for a wonderful, informative, learning, fun, Buddhist, photography week in Bangkok”.

~ Sandy Edwards

Join Jack Picone for one – to – one photography tuition designed to address your photographic needs! It will be an extraordinary experience!

What I teach you can’t be found on YouTube!

Tuition Costs  $US445 per day & $US335 per half day

What I teach can’t be found on YouTube

With discount: Now $US400.50 and US$301.50

 

*Discounts apply for couples and groups and for sessions five days and longer.

*Concerning cost: Cost is below my day and half day rates that I bill editorial clients as a professional photographer. I have been working in excess of thirty years as a professional photographer for the world’s leading media publications. I have a Masters in Visual Arts and  a Ph.D. in Documentary Photography.  What I impart during one-to-one tutorials cannot be found on a YouTube video. What you take away is; knowledge that you will be able to apply over and over again to your own photography, elevating the aesthetic of your authored images – hyperbolically. 

Reportage Photography Workshops tutor Jack Picone delivers one-on-one tuition to individuals and groups (up to four) in Thailand and neighboring Asian countries. One-to-one tuition is for people who are interested in fast-tracking their photographic skill and vision.

Tuition can be individually structured to accommodate photographers learning requirements.

Jack is a working photojournalist and documentary photographer with extensive experience as a photography educator.

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(Above and below) One-to-one participants at work in Bangkok’s urban slum area, Khlong Toei.

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Includes

On location shooting instruction, intensive post-shooting editing, critiquing, sequencing and basic Photoshop.

When?  

On a rolling basis 2016-2017. Book early to secure your ideal dates.

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(Above) Jeffrey Jue with local Nepalese photographer Sailendra Kharel, during a one – to – one tutorial in Kathmandu in Nepal.

Contact

To receive further information about one – to – one tuition or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for travel to Asia.

 

Fujifilm x/100s

In Street Photography on August 13, 2016 at 7:14 AM

Even though a reasonable amount of time has eclipsed since Fujifilm launched [2013] the x/100I still find myself imbued with it. It is intuitive to use, produces technically superb files and is discreet. Here is a link to a short video of me using it while in Burma or now as it is known Myanmar.

 

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A mother cares for her son during a ferry crossing on the Irrawaddy River Yangon, Burma.                                                                                                                           

        Photograph by © Jack Picone

 

In-Print | A Small Selection Of Magazine Tear Sheets

In Photography News on April 4, 2016 at 3:29 AM

The interaction between photographer and designer is an often fractious one. Competing agendas can ensue. Some designers view photographs as creative visual building blocks that are merely part of an end design.
Most photographers view their authored images as sacrosanct. They strongly object to their photographs being altered – in any way – to fit a preordained design.
Sparks can fly!
Below are several examples of where a confluence of design and photography have found a creative and aesthetic balance.

 

JackPicone_LE'Xpress_Mag_Web-0                                                                    • L’Express Magazine, France.

 

 
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                                • L’Express Magazine, France.

 

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                               • Dynasty Magazine, China.

JackPicone_GOODWEEKEND--MAG-SPREAD_-21                          • Good Weekend Magazine, Australia.

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                        • (Above and below) The Financial Review Magazine, Australia.

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                                       • The Financial Review Magazine, Australia.

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                        • Above (2x) Foreign Policy Magazine, USA.

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                       • The Saturday Independent Magazine, UK.

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                                       • (Above 3x) Mare Magazine, Germany.

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                       • Marie Claire Magazine, Australia.

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                                       • The Independent On Sunday Magazine, UK.

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                                               • (Above 3x) TIME Magazine.

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                                                              TIME Magazine.

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                                       • (Above 2x) ‘COLORS’ Magazine

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                        • L’Express Magazine, France.

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                                         • Kultur Magazine, Germany.

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                                        • The Observer Magazine, UK.

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                                        • (Above 2x) TEMPO Magazine, Germany.

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                                       • Al Jazeera Magazine, Qatar.

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                       • HQ Magazine, Australia.

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                                       • Al Jazeera Magazine, Qatar.

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                                                                                        • TIME Magazine.

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                                                                                        • Worldview Magazine, USA.

Reinterpretation

In Random Moments on February 27, 2016 at 4:35 AM

Interesting to see one of my iconic photographs [Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery] in a copy artists shop in central Bangkok being reinterpreted as a painting.

It is unfinished, and the artist was nowhere to be found. As a photographer, it is odd to see one of your photographs morphing into another medium. Odd — good — so far.

I am curious to enter into a dialogue with the artist and intrigued to see what it will look like when finished.

Exciting.

JackPicone_GHM_Painting-1                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone                       

        Above, work-in-progress painting of “Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery”.

 

 

Thai/Burma Border                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone   

        Above, the original black and white photograph made on the Thai-Burma border.

THE GIRL ON THE POSTCARD

In Photography News on October 9, 2015 at 1:04 PM

The Girl On The Postcard – Al Jazeera Magazine.

Words and Photographs by Jack Picone.

 

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JackPicone_Kayan-LR-7                 © Photograph by Jack Picone. Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border.

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JackPicone_Kayan_LR-9               Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

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A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.  © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JP-PhD_KAYAN-LR-13This Spanish tourist took the brass ring from a Kayan woman and put it over his head. He thought it was funny and so did his friends. Few tourists who visit the village of Nai Soi really understand that it is in fact a refugee camp they are visiting and that the Kayan people they are photographing, videoing and gawking at are effectively imprisoned. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JackPicone_Kayan_Women-LR-1A Kayan woman baths wearing her brass coil. The coil is made of heavy brass weighing around 10lbs it takes significant effort for her to support her neck as she bathes. Nai Soi, Mae Hong Son, Thailand. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

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Reflection of Kayan woman. The small triangular mirror is used by the Kayan woman as they groom themselves. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.07.10 PM

Ends.

Postscript: For accuracy sake please be aware that Ma Da, the young female subject in my earlier photographs, died in the Nai Soi camp at the age of 22 from a stomach illness caused by the insanitary conditions at the camp. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border.

HOPE | A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION by PATRICK BROWN in BANGKOK

In Photography News on September 28, 2015 at 2:45 AM

The American Photographer Lee Friedlander {b. 1934} once said he was mostly interested in photographing ‘people and things’, but it could be suggested that he expressed those interests in the depiction of places. A photograph can transport the viewer to the street corner of the town they live in, to the next city or the edge of the earth.

A photograph is created by a photographer standing in a particular place at a specific time. Amongst the many reasons for a photographer initially making the photograph one that is paramount is that the photographer wishes to ‘take the viewer there’.

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Patrick Brown’s polaroid landscapes of Australia’s ‘Never Never’ (As Indigenous Australians sometimes refer to the Outback) exhibition titled, HOPE and on show at The Jam Factory in Bangkok Sept. 17 – Oct. 17th succeeds eminently in ‘taking the viewer there’.

Brown’s dark and brooding polaroids not only ‘take the viewer there’ they also act as a kind of emotional trigger. On viewing the polaroids a yearning to travel to where Brown painstakingly made his photographs follows. The want to explore the places and understand the secret of their beauty beckons.

As with Brown’s polaroids, compelling photographs always ask more questions than they ever answer. Questions similar to, what is my relation to these vast ‘forever’ spaces? Where do I or not fit in?

What is unique about this exhibition is that Brown has answered some of the questions photographs like these often ask. He has been successful in reading the visual signifiers’ and messages thrown at him by the natural (and at times the manmade world) which is busy in an endless cycle of creation and destruction. He has given their indicators shape and context. He puts the viewer and by extension — man the protagonist — squarely ‘there’. It becomes evident that man is not just standing on the edge of these landscapes. Man is center stage. He has ideologically, historically, economically, agriculturally, spiritually interacted and finally appropriated these vast spaces. Harmony, discord, fruitfulness, barrenness, utopia and destruction amongst a myriad of others have followed. Man’s interaction is burnt into landscapes not unlike the burnt landscapes themselves documented here. Perhaps the most important question these photographs solicit from the viewer is; will man protect these spaces for future generations or exploit and destroy them as he has done since time immemorial?

Each photograph in HOPE responds to the viewer in the form of a contemplative experience and potently compels the viewer to – question everything. ~ JP