Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Documentary Photography’

Turning The Tide

In Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 10:07 AM

Thailand’s village of Samut Chin: Turning the tide

The Thai village of Samut Chin is drowning in an invading sea, with little stopping the advancing destruction....read more

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-16

The local village shop acts as a meeting area for Ban Khun Samut Chin village community © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-17

The local village shop acts as a meeting area for Ban Khun Samut Chin village community © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-11

Bamboo breakwaters that were built several years ago to ‘break’ the power of the surf and protect Ban Khun Samut Chin village have only been partially successful. Submerged trees and mangrove saplings that have drowned in the advancing seawater are clearly visible. © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-32

Submerged telegraph poles tapering off into the distance. These poles act as visual markers for where Ban Khun Samut Chin village was located before it was claimed by the sea.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-31

Fishing and shrimp farming are the mainstays and principal sources of activity and income for Khun Samut Chin village. Even small rises in sea level throws out the delicate environmental balance of shrimp farming.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-14

 Fishermen motor out to sea past the breakwaters that were built several years ago in an effort to “break” the power of the surf and protect Ban Khun Samut Chin village © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-28

Three of the five monks remaining at Samut Trawat temple suspend Thai flags to poles along the entrance walkway.  © Jack Picone

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-9

The principal Buddha statue at Wat Khun Samut Trawat faces the advancing sea.  © Jack Picone

 

JackPicone_ClimateChange_AJ-34

At twilight, a resident Monk from Wat Khun Samut Trawat gazes out to sea and says, “That is where our village once was”.  © Jack Picone

~ Ends.

Advertisements

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

Reinterpretation

In Random Moments on February 27, 2016 at 4:35 AM

Interesting to see one of my iconic photographs [Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery] in a copy artists shop in central Bangkok being reinterpreted as a painting.

It is unfinished, and the artist was nowhere to be found. As a photographer, it is odd to see one of your photographs morphing into another medium. Odd — good — so far.

I am curious to enter into a dialogue with the artist and intrigued to see what it will look like when finished.

Exciting.

JackPicone_GHM_Painting-1                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone                       

        Above, work-in-progress painting of “Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery”.

 

 

Thai/Burma Border                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone   

        Above, the original black and white photograph made on the Thai-Burma border.

Random Street Portrait

In Random Moments on February 7, 2016 at 5:08 AM
JackPicone_Eyes-Head-LR-1

                                                                                         Photograph by © Jack Picone


The people you see on the way back from the launderette.‘You Need Eyes In The Back Of Your Head’.

THE GIRL ON THE POSTCARD

In Photography News on October 9, 2015 at 1:04 PM

The Girl On The Postcard – Al Jazeera Magazine.

Words and Photographs by Jack Picone.

 

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.08.35 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-09 at 6.14.29 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.09.04 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.09.55 PM

JackPicone_Kayan-LR-7                 © Photograph by Jack Picone. Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border.

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.10.15 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.10.34 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.10.58 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 7.11.15 PM

 

JackPicone_Kayan_LR-9               Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.04.35 PM

 

A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.  © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JP-PhD_KAYAN-LR-13This Spanish tourist took the brass ring from a Kayan woman and put it over his head. He thought it was funny and so did his friends. Few tourists who visit the village of Nai Soi really understand that it is in fact a refugee camp they are visiting and that the Kayan people they are photographing, videoing and gawking at are effectively imprisoned. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JackPicone_Kayan_Women-LR-1A Kayan woman baths wearing her brass coil. The coil is made of heavy brass weighing around 10lbs it takes significant effort for her to support her neck as she bathes. Nai Soi, Mae Hong Son, Thailand. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.05.47 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.05.22 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.05.02 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.06.37 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.06.56 PM

JP-PhD_KAYAN-LR-15

Reflection of Kayan woman. The small triangular mirror is used by the Kayan woman as they groom themselves. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.07.10 PM

Ends.

Postscript: For accuracy sake please be aware that Ma Da, the young female subject in my earlier photographs, died in the Nai Soi camp at the age of 22 from a stomach illness caused by the insanitary conditions at the camp. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border.

HOPE | A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION by PATRICK BROWN in BANGKOK

In Photography News on September 28, 2015 at 2:45 AM

The American Photographer Lee Friedlander {b. 1934} once said he was mostly interested in photographing ‘people and things’, but it could be suggested that he expressed those interests in the depiction of places. A photograph can transport the viewer to the street corner of the town they live in, to the next city or the edge of the earth.

A photograph is created by a photographer standing in a particular place at a specific time. Amongst the many reasons for a photographer initially making the photograph one that is paramount is that the photographer wishes to ‘take the viewer there’.

11986555_10152963807447085_2005787143518504552_n

Patrick Brown’s polaroid landscapes of Australia’s ‘Never Never’ (As Indigenous Australians sometimes refer to the Outback) exhibition titled, HOPE and on show at The Jam Factory in Bangkok Sept. 17 – Oct. 17th succeeds eminently in ‘taking the viewer there’.

Brown’s dark and brooding polaroids not only ‘take the viewer there’ they also act as a kind of emotional trigger. On viewing the polaroids a yearning to travel to where Brown painstakingly made his photographs follows. The want to explore the places and understand the secret of their beauty beckons.

As with Brown’s polaroids, compelling photographs always ask more questions than they ever answer. Questions similar to, what is my relation to these vast ‘forever’ spaces? Where do I or not fit in?

What is unique about this exhibition is that Brown has answered some of the questions photographs like these often ask. He has been successful in reading the visual signifiers’ and messages thrown at him by the natural (and at times the manmade world) which is busy in an endless cycle of creation and destruction. He has given their indicators shape and context. He puts the viewer and by extension — man the protagonist — squarely ‘there’. It becomes evident that man is not just standing on the edge of these landscapes. Man is center stage. He has ideologically, historically, economically, agriculturally, spiritually interacted and finally appropriated these vast spaces. Harmony, discord, fruitfulness, barrenness, utopia and destruction amongst a myriad of others have followed. Man’s interaction is burnt into landscapes not unlike the burnt landscapes themselves documented here. Perhaps the most important question these photographs solicit from the viewer is; will man protect these spaces for future generations or exploit and destroy them as he has done since time immemorial?

Each photograph in HOPE responds to the viewer in the form of a contemplative experience and potently compels the viewer to – question everything. ~ JP

Cuba 2018 Workshop

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

Register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions to modernity.

Secure a place with a US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic. This workshop is open to all regardless of your level of photography practice.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: A special price of US$1,850 includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Final deadline for registration is Thursday, Oct. 18th.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

 

Exclusive book signing at Ballarat International Foto Biennale, August 22.

In Photography News on August 11, 2015 at 5:30 AM

Stephen Dupont will be signing copies of his new book published by Steidl titled Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars 1993 – 2012. This will be a first time signing of the book. Go along to the Art Gallery of Ballarat on Saturday August 22nd between 2pm and 3pm to purchase books. Stephen will also have some of the last limited edition copies of Piksa Niugini available and more of his books. 1510687_117759638564598_746103430785015757_nAlso Stephen and myself are taking bookings for our next workshop event in Havana, Cuba Dec 6th – 11th. Click here  for further details.  All enquires to jack@jackpicone.com and stephendupont@bigpond.com

 

TEN MUSEUM FINE ART BLACK AND WHITE PRINTS

In Random Moments on October 10, 2014 at 3:51 AM

TEN MUSEUM FINE ART BLACK AND WHITE PRINTS: PRINTED ON FUJICOLOR CRYSTAL ARCHIVE TYPE C PAPER: BOXED AND OPEN EDITION #NEW

Introducing a collectors’ box set of 10 of my favorite photographs for lovers of fine art black-and-white photography. The images are printed on museum-quality paper and presented in a beautiful handmade box crafted from archival materials.

JackPicone-BoxArtPrints_LR-0

JackPicone-BoxArtPrints_LR-3

The images selected from my archive span 25 years of documentary photography on four continents, and have been chosen on the basis of their aesthetic appeal to those passionate about the black-and-white medium.

The box includes:

+ 10 impeccable and beautifully printed museum-quality Type C archival prints. Signed (“en verso” in pencil), dated and embossed, and including a brief description of each individual photograph. Print size is 17 x  11 inches.

JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-7

“Nuba Mountains”, Sudan. 1994

1200 MILES LIFE AND DEATH ON THE THAI/BURMA BORDER

“Golden Horse Monastery”, Thailand. 2006
 
JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-9     “Kayan Woman”.  Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand. 2005

JPB

“Swallows”.  Manado Bay, Sulawesi. 2002
 
JP-PhD_SHEARERS-11
“The Morning After”. Outback New South Wales, Australia. 2001

JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-3

“River Crossing”. Rangoon, Burma. 2013
 
 
JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-5
“Banks Of The Buriganga River”.  Dhaka, Bangladesh. 2013

JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-6

“Inclement Weather”.  Shibuya Crossing, Tokyo, Japan. 2013.

JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-8

“The Letter”. Sydney, Australia. 1999

JP-Art-Dhow-CarDoor-LR-154

” Riding the Wind”. Zanzibar, Tanzania. 1997

+ Prints are archival quality in detachable cream colored mounts.

+ A certificate of authenticity.

About the Artist

Jack Picone is the recipient of several of photography’s most prestigious international awards. These include the World Press Awards, the U.S. Photographer of The Year Awards (POY), the Mother Jones/IFDP Grant for Social Documentary Photography and a UNESCO Documentary Photography Award. His work has been exhibited in major galleries and venues worldwide, including the National Portrait Gallery in Australia and at the prestigious Visa d’Or Reportage Festival in France.

For the past 25 years Picone has covered wars and major social issues in Asia, Africa and Europe. He is a co-founder of Australia’s REPORTAGE photography festival, the founder of Communiqué (a series of documentary photography workshops in Asia) and a member of the collective SOUTH. He completed a PhD in Documentary Photography at Griffith University in Queensland Australia, and lectures in photography at universities in Australia and Hong Kong.

His work is held in collections at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra, The Australian War Memorial and The State Library of New South Wales, Australia.

Picone’s training in photography was in using black and white film and mastering traditional darkroom print-making. It is a passion that has never faded thanks to the medium’s unrivalled capacity for both subtlety and drama. As legendary photographer Robert Frank expressed it in 1951: “Black and white are the colours of photography. To me they symbolise the alternatives of hope and despair to which mankind is forever subjected.”

Born in Australia, Picone is currently based in Bangkok.

Print Sales

Boxed Open Edition Fine Art Black and White Prints. Box contains 10 beautiful museum-quality prints priced at:

US$5, 495 (exclusive of shipping).

Contact

With over 30 years of knowledge and experience as a photographer, I am committed to advising and supporting anyone wishing to buy my photographs or develop a photography collection.

Contact Jack Picone on +66894880508 or jack@jackpicone.com

______________________________________________

Censorship

In Photography News on August 18, 2013 at 8:28 AM

Reportage Festival Director Stephen Dupont and photographer Jack Picone discuss how censorship by Tourism NSW, impacted on Reportage Festival.

Screen Shot 2013-07-24 at 3.31.30 PM

View here:

For an more in-depth report concerning censorship during Reportage’s documentary festival and censorship in general in the Arts in Australia; Please read this report by RICHARD PHILLIPS: Photojournalists, artist censored by Australian authorities.