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Posts Tagged ‘Picone Documentary Workshops’

Fujifilm’s New X-T4

In Ethics, Kathmandu, Photography, Photography News, Random Moments, Street Photography, Workshop News on August 3, 2020 at 7:25 PM

A special collaboration with Fujifilm Cameras

Story from Australia’s Better Photography Magazine’s Editor, Peter Eastway.
All photographs were taken © by Jack Picone during
cremations at Pashupatinath Temple in Kathmandu.
JACK PICONE: FAST, FLUID AND INTUITIVE
Fujifilm’s Amazing New X-T4

What does it take to be a successful documentary photographer?

Apart from the skills required to find and capture the images, most of the better- known documentary photographers you’ll meet are also deeply-thinking individuals. For them, photography is only a part of their personal involvement with the world – how they interact with their subjects is equally

important.

 

 

 

 

Jack Picone

Australian-born Jack Picone shoots editorial, corporate, architectural and street photography professionally. Over the past three decades, he has covered wars and social issues in Australia, Asia, Africa and Europe, and his work has won several international awards, including World Press Awards, the U.S. Photographer of the Year Awards (POY) and the Mother Jones/IFDP Grant for Social Documentary Photography. Professor Picone is also passionate about educating new generation photographers, passing on his experiences and ideas, but after all, this, what continues to drive Jack are his personal projects.

“Generally, my personal work is street photography and currently I’m working on ‘The Other Chinatown’in Bangkok and a surreal shopping mall rooftop zoo, also in Bangkok, called ‘Pata Zoo’.“

While Jack acknowledges challenges that all documentary photographers face – finding stories, access to subjects, engaging with subjects and obtaining permissions, it’s the nature of the interaction that is most important to him.

“I find it challenging to achieve an ethical balance with the people I document in longer-term documentary photography projects.” In other words (and at the risk of over-simplifying the issue), a wealthy first-world photographer documenting a poorer or disadvantaged subject creates an immediate bias, no matter how genuine the project is.

Collaboration

“I have partly surmounted this challenge by collaborating with the people I photograph”, explained Jack.

“I once read that it is impossible (without getting into the subject’s skin) to share an identical purpose. That said, and as Sarah Pink (in Doing Visual Ethnography, 2007) observes, working in close parallel can help to offset the unequal power relationship that often exists between a subject and a practitioner, resulting in a body of work that is more ethically balanced.”

Unobtrusive

Readers looking at Jack’s work (and that of other great documentary photographers), often wonder what cameras and techniques were used and while these aspects are important, the strength of the images usually results from addressing other issues, such as ethics.

Having said that, how does Jack work when he’s out in the field? Does he walk up to his subjects and shoot with a wide-angle lens, or shoot from an unobserved distance?

“It depends on the genre of photography I am working in”, answered Jack. “If it is street photography, I make photographs that avoid ‘disrupting’ the original moments unfolding. If documentary photography, then I meet people, spend time with them and invite them to have a say in their documentation.”

However, whether street or documentary photography, Jack believes the smaller and less obtrusive the camera, the better. “Some people are intimidated by cameras and house- brick size DLSRs only amplify any intrusion or intimidation.”

And in a nutshell, Jack is explaining why he is a keen advocate for the Fujifilm X-series cameras.

“The Fujifilm X-T cameras are small and

unobtrusive. Their retro design also makes them less intimidating and I think it is this combination that creates potent and positive psychology when photographing people, especially those in fragile situations.”

Before its release, Jack tested the new Fujifilm X-T4 in Kathmandu, Nepal on an assignment.

“Like Kathmandu itself, the X-T4 has a dual personality: On the outside, it resonates retro with classic design lines not eclipsed by time. On the inside, it is all twenty-first-century space-age technology. It’s a compelling combination.

“Nepal is a spiritually multi-dimensional and creative place. Much of its creativity is rooted in Hinduism. In Kathmandu, Hinduism is omnipresent in life and death. In fact, Hinduism is a conversation between life and death and it is reflected in Nepalese culture with its religious iconography, art, writing, graffiti, music and even the cremations on the banks of the sacred Bagmati river.”

Extreme Edge

“Unlike most Western countries, the Nepalese people are unconcerned with the documentation of their dead. They are inclusive of it because it is an intrinsic part of the Hindu religion, to share life’s experiences and to promote a culture of understanding between people everywhere.

“Hindus believe we are all the same and we are all in this life together. Sharing death is

part of that philosophy.
“Even so, photographing the ritual of death

is mostly about respect, unobtrusiveness and speed. There can be beauty in pathos and poetic and sorrowful photographs can be made or lost in microseconds.

“I found while documenting the cremations at Pashupatinath Temple in Kathmandu that the Fujifilm X-T4’s fold-away LCD screen in combination with the large dials and controls on the top deck allowed me to work fast, stay in the moment and learn about the Nepalese peoples’ conversation with death. I can’t imagine working with a camera that requires you to scrolling through endless menu pages!

“I push my cameras to the extreme edge of their capabilities. Having six and a half stops of image stabilisation, lighting fast autofocus, lots of film simulation modes and extra battery life, keeps me on that ‘edge’ where most of the potent photographs happen.

“The Fujifilm X-T4 is intuitive, fast, fluid and a natural extension of me and my creativity.”

For more information on the Fujifilm X-T4, visit fujifilm-x

+ All photos also used the Bleach Bypass film simulation mode.


 

RWANDA PEACE VII/F The VII Foundation

In Photography, Photography News on April 16, 2019 at 12:58 PM

April 2019 is the 25th anniversary of the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
As you read this, Rwandan people are midst 100 days of mourning.
The final number of people who died (and maimed) in the most violent, base and horrific of circumstances has never truly been quantified. Educated estimates place the death toll, conservatively, at one million people. Previously unknown mass grave sites are still being discovered, today. The depth and breadth and vast scale of death solicit inevitable comparisons of the wholesale slaughter of the Jewish community during the second world war and the Cambodian genocide in South-Esat Asia.

In 1994, I documented and reported on the genocide as it unfolded. After crossing the border illegally from Uganda with fellow photographer and friend Stephen Dupont we quickly realized that we had easily, too easily, walked through a door into hell on earth. In front of us was; a burnt, blighted, broken, bomb and a bullet-scarred landscape peppered with the dismembered dead. We ricochet across Rwanda in the back of pick-up gun trucks with the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF). At times we crossed paths and interviewed the RPF’s leader Major General Kagame (now President Kagame) as he led his men and pushed towards the capital Kigali to regain power, he saw was theirs. During the battle for RPF to regain power, Rwanda spiralled into a politically toxic and human abyss. Rwanda almost fell off the edge of the world. Such was the heightened level of destructiveness, horror and carnage dispensed by both Tutsis and Hutus it is not implausible to suggest that Rwanda may have never been seen again. It was on the cusp of annihilation.

Fast forward >> to the Twenty-First Century; The VII Foundation is examing countries now at peace (like Rwanda in this case) critically and with rigour and by dispatching leading photographers and writers of war to those countries where they first reported from during the conflict to consider them contemporarily.
Some of the other countries and regions included in the series include; Iraq, Cambodia, Bosnia, Colombia and The Middle East.

I have recently returned from Rwanda working with The VII Foundation VII/F documentary film crew making a feature-length documentary film re-tracing the dark journey I made in 1994. I was assigned by VII Foundation Directors Gary Knight, Ron Haviv and Directed and collaborated with Fiona Turner. On the
ground in Rwanda, I collaborated with the erudite VII Cinematographers and photographers, Christopher Morris and Maciek Nabrdalik our translator and Rwandan all things cultural ambassador was Gadi Habumugisha. Peter Klein the legendary Producer, Director and Founder of The Global Reporting Centre kept us all flying at a high altitude and being the best we could be.

As quintessentially important and necessary as it is documenting war, media is often absorbed with documenting wars as they unfold. The distinction here is, the VII Foundation Peace Project is innovative in adjusting the balance by extending the documentation and the conversation to be more inclusive of the aftermath of war. It is an exploration of countries previously ravaged by war, considering the legacy and impact of war upon their specific culture and country. It is rooted in reflectively making an attempt to quantify the ‘quality of peace’ in post-war time and most importantly – maintaining peace.

Our Rwanda at Peace documentary is in the editing suite for a while yet but as soon as I hear of a release date. I’ll make a post about where and when it can be viewed for those interested.
I have attached a random précis of photographs made during the 1994 genocide (as historical documents) and some contemporary photographs of Rwanda in 2019 – at Peace.

 

Rwanda April 1994

 

An RPF rebel soldier advances towards Kigali during the Rwandan genocide, Rwanda.

 

Rwanda February 2019

Alice Mukarurinda (right) and the genocidaire Emmanuel Ndayisaba (left). Emmanual viciously attacked Alice during the genocide cutting her hand off and leaving her for dead. Against all odds, both have reconciled with each other and now teach reconciliation to fellow perpetrators and victims caught up in the 1994 genocide.

Ecotourism (above and below) is a major contributor to Rwanda’s growing economy. In these photographs, Rwandans perform for foreign tourists at The Guardian Village an Eco lodge in Ruhengeri.

Belancila (Laurencie Nyirabeza’s close friend who was murdered during the genocide) Taba, Kigali.

Poignant and pervading photographs installation at the Kigali Genocide Memorial of Rwandans who were slaughtered in the 1994 genocide.

Ruth Mukankuranga mid-class at Karushaka, Prefecture, Kigali. Pre the 1994 genocide many teachers imparted discrimination against ethnic Tutsis via anti-Tutsi writings within school textbooks.

Agnes Nyiransabimana (red headdress) Pyrethrum flower farm owner with her workers harvesting Pyrethrum flowers outside of Ruhengeri (or Musanze) a city in northwest Rwanda.

 

A one on one interview (Jack Picone green jacket) with The President of Rwanda, Paul Kagame (blue windcheater). Producer, Peter Klein (far right).

Dairy cow shepherds care for their cows, Rubavu (former Gisenyi), Rwanda.

“Bringing in the wheat” (and below) outside of Ruhengeri (or Musanze) a city in northwest Rwanda. It’s the gateway to Volcanoes National Park, home to mountain gorillas and golden monkeys.                       

 

This is “Umuganda,” a community cleanup held on the last Saturday of every month. It is the reason that Rwanda is known as the cleanest city on the African continent. Kigali, Rwanda.

Daily life in and around Kigali’s CBD.

Daily life in and around Kigali’s CBD.

Dairy cow shepherds care for their cows, Rubavu (former Gisenyi), Rwanda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~JP

Perfect for you?!

In Photography, Photography News, Workshop News on September 26, 2018 at 2:57 PM

If you can, pick up a copy of Australia’s contemporary and clever photography Magazine – [capture]. It is available in both print and online.

 

I am featured along with several noted Australian photographers [contacts below] concerning what our perfect camera would be.

Novel idea.

Below is an extract from the feature article inclusive of my thoughts about what my perfect camera might look like.

News Flash! We still have some places remaining on our up coming photography workshop in Havana, Cuba. If you are interested in going us view the details here and ping me an email  with any questions you might have.

 

 

 

~ Ends

 

 

Katoomba Photography Workshop: 8th-12th Dec. 2017.

In Photography, Workshop News on October 7, 2017 at 4:30 AM

We are taking bookings for Reportage Photography Workshops next workshop in Katoomba, Australia, 8th-12th Dec. 2017.

Update: We are happy to announce this workshop is now priced in Aus$ representing a discount of Aus$520!

Join Stephen and I (Jack) for an unforgettable experience in photography, place, and space.
         © iPhone Photograph by Jack Picone
View from a graffitied train window in the Blue Mountains en route to Katoomba. ‘Graffiti’ is based on the Italian word graffio (which means ‘scratch’).
Entrancing Katoomba is 110 kilometers west of Sydney at an altitude of 1,017 meters. It is situated in the Blue Mountains. The Blue Mountains, including Katoomba, is the traditional land of the Gundungurra people and indigenous habitation of the Blue Mountains dates from around 22,000 years ago. The name ‘Ka-toom-bah’, is thought to have emanated from local indigenous people and when translated is said to mean ‘place of many waterfalls.’
It is a popular destination for day-trippers from Sydney and international travelers both lured there by its country town main street, cafes, galleries, and antique shops. But for a photographer, Katoomba is much more than that.
Katoomba is a spiritual and visual mother lode; palpable indigenous peoples ancient history, white man’s recent history, a kaleidoscope of architecture from Federation to now. Local people, who have ‘creativity’ as an in-common gene, bewitching light, impossible mountain landscapes, old trees that reach for the sky, all of which make your heart miss a beat and ask, ‘why has it taken me so long to be here.’
Workshop Overview: This workshop is open to photographers who practice any genre and are at any level. We promote, support and are all inclusive of female photographers.
Award-winning documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, the acclaimed photographer, and filmmaker. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-to-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.
Individual and group sessions are held to dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your style. The workshop is very project based as opposed to technically driven.
The aim is to produce a photo-essay with a striking visual narrative, to be projected on the final evening of the workshop.
The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding.
Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A AUS$500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place. This will be a popular workshop; please book early to avoid disappointment.
Tuition Cost: AUS$1950
Cost includes all workshop sessions. Cost is not inclusive of travel and accommodation.
To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: Jack Picone: jack@jackpicone.com or Stephen Dupont: stephendupont1@me.com
Links:
Jack Picone
Stephen Dupont

Sebastiao Salgado “The World Through His Eyes,” Exhibition In Bangkok

In Photography News on February 26, 2017 at 5:16 AM

If you happen to be in Bangkok at the moment, the venerable Brazilian documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado has an exhibition at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre. It opened Feb. 9, 2017. Salgado is probably one of the most ethical and environmentally conscious contemporary photographers practicing in the world today.
The exhibition is titled “Sebastiao Salgado: The World Through His Eyes,” The expansive exhibition of 120 black-and-white images by Salgado at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre is Salgado’s first major exhibition in Thailand and will open to the public until March 8.
In parts, the work is both deeply moving and inspirational.
Paradoxically, No Photographs are allowed in the actual gallery space itself?

~Jack Picone

jackpicone_salgado_exhibition-lr-1A security guard enforces, “No Photo” dictate at  Salgado exhibition. © Photograph by Jack Picone

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

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Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

Poetry and Photography

In Photography News on October 1, 2016 at 3:04 AM

Recently, I have been collaborating creatively with the poet, Kit Kelen. I have been posting photographs and Kit has been writing poems to accompany my photographs. Seeing poetry and photography collectively, as opposed to singularly is a  journey into a new creative landscape.

Over coming days I will post a small random selection of Kit’s poems. You can also visit this link and below to view Kit’s blog for this project titled 365+1. You’ll find a plethora of great poetry and art from other contributors.  

Kit Kelen – Series with Jack Picone’s Photographs – #14 – the fire at dawn, the waiting 

 14

the fire at dawn, the waiting

is it the bones show through?

is it the where-they-are waking?

so sombre silent still

as if the sky were nothing

as if they were earth already

they compose themselves

for eternity’s frame

have they fallen from great heights to here?

are they stones sprung up in flesh?

I ask because

I just don’t know

what any of this means

                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Young PNG Highlanders at the crack of dawn. Mt. Hagen, PNG.

In-Print | A Small Selection Of Magazine Tear Sheets

In Photography News on April 4, 2016 at 3:29 AM

The interaction between photographer and designer is an often fractious one. Competing agendas can ensue. Some designers view photographs as creative visual building blocks that are merely part of an end design.
Most photographers view their authored images as sacrosanct. They strongly object to their photographs being altered – in any way – to fit a preordained design.
Sparks can fly!
Below are several examples of where a confluence of design and photography have found a creative and aesthetic balance.

 

JackPicone_LE'Xpress_Mag_Web-0                                                                    • L’Express Magazine, France.

 

 
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                                • L’Express Magazine, France.

 

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                               • Dynasty Magazine, China.

JackPicone_GOODWEEKEND--MAG-SPREAD_-21                          • Good Weekend Magazine, Australia.

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JackPicone_Magazine_Spreads_CondeNastTraveller_Web-5 copy

                        • (Above and below) The Financial Review Magazine, Australia.

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JackPicone_Magazine_Spreads_CondeNastTraveller_Web_2

                                       • The Financial Review Magazine, Australia.

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                        • Above (2x) Foreign Policy Magazine, USA.

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                       • The Saturday Independent Magazine, UK.

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                                       • (Above 3x) Mare Magazine, Germany.

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                       • Marie Claire Magazine, Australia.

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                                       • The Independent On Sunday Magazine, UK.

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                                               • (Above 3x) TIME Magazine.

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                                                              TIME Magazine.

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                                       • (Above 2x) ‘COLORS’ Magazine

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                        • L’Express Magazine, France.

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                                         • Kultur Magazine, Germany.

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                                        • The Observer Magazine, UK.

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                                        • (Above 2x) TEMPO Magazine, Germany.

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                                       • Al Jazeera Magazine, Qatar.

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                       • HQ Magazine, Australia.

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                                       • Al Jazeera Magazine, Qatar.

JackPicone_Magazine_Spreads_'TIME-Mag._4

                                                                                        • TIME Magazine.

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                                                                                        • Worldview Magazine, USA.

Reinterpretation

In Random Moments on February 27, 2016 at 4:35 AM

Interesting to see one of my iconic photographs [Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery] in a copy artists shop in central Bangkok being reinterpreted as a painting.

It is unfinished, and the artist was nowhere to be found. As a photographer, it is odd to see one of your photographs morphing into another medium. Odd — good — so far.

I am curious to enter into a dialogue with the artist and intrigued to see what it will look like when finished.

Exciting.

JackPicone_GHM_Painting-1                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone                       

        Above, work-in-progress painting of “Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery”.

 

 

Thai/Burma Border                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone   

        Above, the original black and white photograph made on the Thai-Burma border.

Bangkok Weekend Photography Masterclass | Nov. 28th – 30th | 2014

In Workshop News on November 20, 2014 at 7:02 AM

General Overview of Bangkok Masterclass

by Nic Dunlop and Jack Picone

JackPicone-BKK_Masterclass-0Street photograph on Silom Road, Bangkok © by Jack Picone 

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with masterclass guest tutor Nic Dunlop , acclaimed photojournalist and filmmaker. Both Nic and Jack will work closely with participants critiquing and editing their authored work.

An introductory get-together and projection will be held on the evening of the 28th (Friday) at, The Jam Factory. Also, on the first evening and just like any working photographer, you will be given an assignment. In this case, the assignment will be a ‘Word’ to interpret as you wish.

The aim is to produce a short photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the masterclass.

Nic and Jack will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns, hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story and how to hone your personal style. The masterclass is very project based as opposed to technically driven and open to all regardless of level of photography. We explore art, travel and traditional social documentary genres.

The masterclass schedule will be challenging, fun and highly rewarding.

Date: November 28th – 30th (Friday evening to Sunday)

Location: The Jam Factory, Bangkok.

Address: 41/1-5 เจริญนคร Khlong San, Bangkok 10600

Phone: 02 861 0950

To Bring: A laptop computer. A digital camera (size and format not important). If you would like to use a cell phone camera – it is okay.

Skill Level: Open to all.

Registration: The Masterclass is strictly limited to 10 participants. Places will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

Cost: $US495.00 Includes all Masterclass sessions. Masterclass cost does not include travel costs to Bangkok and accommodation or travel insurance.

This Masterclass will be particularly popular and will fill fast, so please don’t leave making your full payment to the last minute to avoid disappointment.

For further details and/or to request a registration form please mail Jack Picone: jack@jackpicone.com and Nic Dunlop: nic@nicdunlop.com