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Posts Tagged ‘Fuji’

On Being A Fujifilm | X-Photographer

In Photography, Photography News on August 23, 2019 at 12:27 PM

As a Fujifilm AmbassadorI often get the chance to explore and author photographs with Fujifilm’s ‘thinking out of the box cameras.’ Chinese Opera actors on stage during a performance at Chiao Eng Biao Shrine, Bang Rak Shrine. Sathon Bangkok.
© Photograph by Jack Picone

Have a peek at recent photographs I made with Fujifilm’s X-T3 and X100S cameras.

The X100S was launched in 2013 and has now been superseded by the X100F. Even so, I continue to use it. It is small, ‘quite’ and unobtrusive, a trilogy of psychology in making photographs that is invaluable. Combine this with the legendary and brilliant Fujifilm film science, and it is as relevant today as the day it was released.

Fujifilm’s X-T3 is a triumph of science and art. It is liberating creatively for any photographer who picks it up and puts it to their eye.

Does being a Fujifilm Ambassador make my preceding comments bias? Clearly, ‘yes’ but it is worth keeping in mind if either of these cameras were other than the way I communicate them than you would be reading precisely that.

Two short photo-essays with the X100S and X-T3:

The X100S Chinese Opera in Bangkok

The XT3 Revisiting Rwanda 

jp

 

RWANDA PEACE VII/F The VII Foundation

In Photography, Photography News on April 16, 2019 at 12:58 PM

April 2019 is the 25th anniversary of the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
As you read this, Rwandan people are midst 100 days of mourning.
The final number of people who died (and maimed) in the most violent, base and horrific of circumstances has never truly been quantified. Educated estimates place the death toll, conservatively, at one million people. Previously unknown mass grave sites are still being discovered, today. The depth and breadth and vast scale of death solicit inevitable comparisons of the wholesale slaughter of the Jewish community during the second world war and the Cambodian genocide in South-Esat Asia.

In 1994, I documented and reported on the genocide as it unfolded. After crossing the border illegally from Uganda with fellow photographer and friend Stephen Dupont we quickly realized that we had easily, too easily, walked through a door into hell on earth. In front of us was; a burnt, blighted, broken, bomb and a bullet-scarred landscape peppered with the dismembered dead. We ricochet across Rwanda in the back of pick-up gun trucks with the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF). At times we crossed paths and interviewed the RPF’s leader Major General Kagame (now President Kagame) as he led his men and pushed towards the capital Kigali to regain power, he saw was theirs. During the battle for RPF to regain power, Rwanda spiralled into a politically toxic and human abyss. Rwanda almost fell off the edge of the world. Such was the heightened level of destructiveness, horror and carnage dispensed by both Tutsis and Hutus it is not implausible to suggest that Rwanda may have never been seen again. It was on the cusp of annihilation.

Fast forward >> to the Twenty-First Century; The VII Foundation is examing countries now at peace (like Rwanda in this case) critically and with rigour and by dispatching leading photographers and writers of war to those countries where they first reported from during the conflict to consider them contemporarily.
Some of the other countries and regions included in the series include; Iraq, Cambodia, Bosnia, Colombia and The Middle East.

I have recently returned from Rwanda working with The VII Foundation VII/F documentary film crew making a feature-length documentary film re-tracing the dark journey I made in 1994. I was assigned by VII Foundation Directors Gary Knight, Ron Haviv and Directed and collaborated with Fiona Turner. On the
ground in Rwanda, I collaborated with the erudite VII Cinematographers and photographers, Christopher Morris and Maciek Nabrdalik our translator and Rwandan all things cultural ambassador was Gadi Habumugisha. Peter Klein the legendary Producer, Director and Founder of The Global Reporting Centre kept us all flying at a high altitude and being the best we could be.

As quintessentially important and necessary as it is documenting war, media is often absorbed with documenting wars as they unfold. The distinction here is, the VII Foundation Peace Project is innovative in adjusting the balance by extending the documentation and the conversation to be more inclusive of the aftermath of war. It is an exploration of countries previously ravaged by war, considering the legacy and impact of war upon their specific culture and country. It is rooted in reflectively making an attempt to quantify the ‘quality of peace’ in post-war time and most importantly – maintaining peace.

Our Rwanda at Peace documentary is in the editing suite for a while yet but as soon as I hear of a release date. I’ll make a post about where and when it can be viewed for those interested.
I have attached a random précis of photographs made during the 1994 genocide (as historical documents) and some contemporary photographs of Rwanda in 2019 – at Peace.

 

Rwanda April 1994

 

An RPF rebel soldier advances towards Kigali during the Rwandan genocide, Rwanda.

 

Rwanda February 2019

Alice Mukarurinda (right) and the genocidaire Emmanuel Ndayisaba (left). Emmanual viciously attacked Alice during the genocide cutting her hand off and leaving her for dead. Against all odds, both have reconciled with each other and now teach reconciliation to fellow perpetrators and victims caught up in the 1994 genocide.

Ecotourism (above and below) is a major contributor to Rwanda’s growing economy. In these photographs, Rwandans perform for foreign tourists at The Guardian Village an Eco lodge in Ruhengeri.

Belancila (Laurencie Nyirabeza’s close friend who was murdered during the genocide) Taba, Kigali.

Poignant and pervading photographs installation at the Kigali Genocide Memorial of Rwandans who were slaughtered in the 1994 genocide.

Ruth Mukankuranga mid-class at Karushaka, Prefecture, Kigali. Pre the 1994 genocide many teachers imparted discrimination against ethnic Tutsis via anti-Tutsi writings within school textbooks.

Agnes Nyiransabimana (red headdress) Pyrethrum flower farm owner with her workers harvesting Pyrethrum flowers outside of Ruhengeri (or Musanze) a city in northwest Rwanda.

 

A one on one interview (Jack Picone green jacket) with The President of Rwanda, Paul Kagame (blue windcheater). Producer, Peter Klein (far right).

Dairy cow shepherds care for their cows, Rubavu (former Gisenyi), Rwanda.

“Bringing in the wheat” (and below) outside of Ruhengeri (or Musanze) a city in northwest Rwanda. It’s the gateway to Volcanoes National Park, home to mountain gorillas and golden monkeys.                       

 

This is “Umuganda,” a community cleanup held on the last Saturday of every month. It is the reason that Rwanda is known as the cleanest city on the African continent. Kigali, Rwanda.

Daily life in and around Kigali’s CBD.

Daily life in and around Kigali’s CBD.

Dairy cow shepherds care for their cows, Rubavu (former Gisenyi), Rwanda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~JP

Perfect for you?!

In Photography, Photography News, Workshop News on September 26, 2018 at 2:57 PM

If you can, pick up a copy of Australia’s contemporary and clever photography Magazine – [capture]. It is available in both print and online.

 

I am featured along with several noted Australian photographers [contacts below] concerning what our perfect camera would be.

Novel idea.

Below is an extract from the feature article inclusive of my thoughts about what my perfect camera might look like.

News Flash! We still have some places remaining on our up coming photography workshop in Havana, Cuba. If you are interested in going us view the details here and ping me an email  with any questions you might have.

 

 

 

~ Ends

 

 

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

In Photography News on July 26, 2017 at 3:58 AM

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

This is a provocative image. I surmise in amongst multiple reasons it was chosen to be the winner was to – provoke. Creativeness, diversity, innovation, and vision in photography should be without boundaries – this is without question. This photograph goes some way to pushing the creative boundaries of photography. You know ‘Space the last frontier,’ go where no man (should be woman as well) has been before stuff boundaries!

                                          © Photograph by Artist Justine Varga

Winner of the Tweed Gallery’s $20,000 Olive Cotton Prize for photographic portraiture was a controversial choice by judge Shaune Lakin [Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra]. The photograph (above) is titled ‘Maternal Line’ and is by Justine Varga.

At this point, it is useful to ask a couple of questions; the first being, does this specific photograph succeed in doing that – being stellar? The second and more pragmatic for many here is the stinging question is, is this a portrait photograph? The answer to the first question lies with the individual viewer given the inbuilt subjectivity of photography itself. There is no x+y=z answer. The second question is also difficult to answer. It is though one needs first to ask what a portrait is? A portrait is defined as a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. No face, head or shoulders here? Though, more broadly a portrait is a representation or impression of someone or something in language or on film or television or in this case – photography. The latter is where we enter the twilight zone. It is plausible that this photograph ‘Maternal Line’ can loosely be defined as a portrait. I think especially because as I understand it, photographer Justine Varga lovingly collaborated with her grandmother in making it. It is a ‘representation’ of her grandmother, and representation can qualify as a portrait. In a very human way, I am touched by Varga’s collaboration with her grandmother in making ‘Maternal Line .’ Saying that I wonder if the final work is as compelling as the collaboration and methodology that produced it in the first place?
As mentioned earlier within the context of those ‘go where no man (or woman of course) has been before frontiers’ of photography; curators, judges, picture editors et al. at times could be more balanced in avoiding choosing photographs that are biased towards methodology and philosophical underpinnings. Yes, the methodology and philosophical underpinnings of a photograph are paramount but not at the expense of dumbing down the aesthetic, and emotion of a photograph. Equity of both methodology and aesthetic produces the most potent and powerful photographs. Any University first-year art photography student can write a three thousand word piece on why the close-up photograph of the wine stained piece of shag pile carpet s/he has photographed is ‘art’ with intellectual and philosophical justification and authority. This is basic 101 University art photography stuff. But the important question that needs to be asked is, is it an accomplishment as an aesthetically evolved and emotionally charged photograph? Does it question us and inform us, delight us and disturb us, make us laugh or cry, extend our understanding of what it is to be human and be part of humanity? Further, still, does it emotionally wound us and remind us what it is to be alive? I wonder? Perhaps in some way it does in a ‘quite’ way or is it that ‘the story’ of the methodology is more compelling in this case?
Could it be that the aesthetic of the ‘Maternal Line’ doesn’t equal the intellectual and philosophical maturity that went into making it? Perhaps this is at the core of the consternation concerning ‘Marternal Line’ winning the Olive Cotton award?
Provocative? Clearly so but at what cost? Generally put provocation at the cost of devolving an evolved aesthetic and emotion is narrow in vision and counterintuitive. Personally, am I provoked by the actual photograph? I I am emotionally moved when considering the intamacy and emotion surrounding the story of making the photograph. But and again, provoked by the actual photograph itself? No, a flat line. I don’t ‘feel’ anything, and that is a problem.

~ JP

External Link: ABC NEWS

External Link: Sydney Morning Herald

Student’s Work From Kathmandu 2011

In Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on April 1, 2017 at 7:04 AM

                                                                                                  © Photograph by Kevin Cooper

This video highlights the compelling photographs authored by participants’ who took part in our last Kathmandu Workshop, July 11-16, 2011.

View video here:

The participants who took part and whose work appears on this video include:

Susie Hagon
Narendra Mainali
Kevin Cooper
Bikash
Cim Sears
Kelly Mac
Nadia Janis
Kellie Lefranchi
Matt Dole
Kate Walton

What can you do?

Our upcoming workshop in Kathmandu is:  August 28th – September 1st, 2017 .

Join us for an unforgettable experience!

For further information please contact:

Stephen Dupont stephendupont1@mac.com  and/or Jack Picone jackvpicone@gmail.com

To register contact Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.comjackvpicone@gmail.com

Music Credit: Clap Hands from Rain Dogs by Tom Waits

Kathmandu September 3rd-7th, 2017

In Workshop News on March 9, 2017 at 2:26 AM

KATHMANDU

September 3rd-7th 

2017

                                                                                                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its second roving workshop in Kathmandu. Kathmandu is one of the world’s most atmospheric cities. Even as urban chaos encroaches, this “city at the top of the world” retains its unique aura of magic, mysticism, and tradition. Over the last decade its roughly one million inhabitants, who are squeezed tightly into the Kathmandu Valley, have also been experiencing a period of major social and political turmoil – from a fierce Maoist insurgency, government curfews, and censorship to mass demonstrations against royal rule and killings of protesters. Democracy was restored in 2006 amid jubilation, and the Maoists have since joined an interim government. Today, many Nepalis believe their country has entered a new era of hope and peace.

What the Travel Guides say:

“Draped along the spine of the Himalaya, Nepal is a land of sublime scenery, time-worn temples, and some of the best hiking trails on earth. It’s a poor country, but it is rich in scenic splendor and cultural treasures. The kingdom has long exerted a pull on the Western imagination. Kathmandu is really two cities: a fabled capital of convivial pilgrims and carved rose-brick temples, and a frenetic sprawl of modern towers, mobbed by beggars and monkeys and smothered in diesel fumes. It simultaneously reeks of history and the encroaching wear and tear of the modern world.” – Lonely Planet

Workshop Overview: Award-winning documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, the acclaimed photojournalist, and filmmaker. Both Stephen and Jack will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-to-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening before the workshop’s formal start. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced before the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.)

The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop. Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style. The workshop is very project based as opposed to technically driven.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns. Interpreters can also be arranged where necessary.

Traditional Photo Essay and Multimedia: During the workshop participants will have an option to produce a completed photo essay within the documentary tradition or in a more contemporary context, a multimedia. In both cases, tutors will be on hand to guide you through the respective process.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place. This is one of our most popular workshops, so book early to avoid disappointment.

Cost: US$1,950 includes all workshops sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Kathmandu and accommodation.

To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: Jack Picone: jackvpicone@gmail.com or Stephen Dupont: stephendupont1@me.com

 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com

Stephen Dupont

http://www.contactpressimages.com/photographers/dupont/dupont_bio.html

 

Sebastiao Salgado “The World Through His Eyes,” Exhibition In Bangkok

In Photography News on February 26, 2017 at 5:16 AM

If you happen to be in Bangkok at the moment, the venerable Brazilian documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado has an exhibition at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre. It opened Feb. 9, 2017. Salgado is probably one of the most ethical and environmentally conscious contemporary photographers practicing in the world today.
The exhibition is titled “Sebastiao Salgado: The World Through His Eyes,” The expansive exhibition of 120 black-and-white images by Salgado at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre is Salgado’s first major exhibition in Thailand and will open to the public until March 8.
In parts, the work is both deeply moving and inspirational.
Paradoxically, No Photographs are allowed in the actual gallery space itself?

~Jack Picone

jackpicone_salgado_exhibition-lr-1A security guard enforces, “No Photo” dictate at  Salgado exhibition. © Photograph by Jack Picone

Taking FujiFilm’s new X100s out for a walk

In Photography News on June 9, 2013 at 1:36 PM

Jack Picone in Myanmar, shooting with Fujifilm X100S

I have just returned from Burma (Myanmar) recently where I had the opportunity to work with FujiFilm’s new X/100s camera.

You can view a short film here made by the Bangkok based film maker Gerhard Joren.

I do collaborate with Fujifilm on various projects with their cameras.  As an aside to that stated collaboration (after shooting with the x/100 for over a week on the road in Burma) it is clear that FujiFilm have fixed the few glitches that  X/100s predecessor  (the x/100) experienced.

FujiFilm have produced a brilliant, ‘thinking outside of the box’ camera. You can view Gerhard’s Joren’s video and some of the stills I authored with the x/100s  here:

JackPicone_Burma_-Fuji-X100s-002                           ©Photograph on the FujiFilm x/100s by Jack Picone

Panorama | Work in Progress | 71 – Degrees

In Street Photography on December 10, 2012 at 8:22 AM

71 – Degrees | by Jack Picone

The images in this gallery have all been made on the Hasselblad X-Pan 1 and the Fuji TX-1 essentially, they are exactly the same camera just branded differently.

Both these cameras are relatively small 35mm film cameras that can produce striking unbroken images across a full 71- degree field of view (the normal field of vision of the human eye, by contrast, is only about 45 degrees). The resulting photographs make concrete the concept of the panorama — quite literally, to “see all.”

I take these cameras with me everywhere I go. They are my, “I am taking my cameras for a walk” cameras. Pictures in this slide gallery are from Bangkok, Hong Kong, Macau, Bali, South Africa, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Kathmandu, Laos, Cambodia China and Australia.

The trick with using these cameras is not to rely too heavily on the actual panorama format in an effort to make your images  more aesthetically interesting. This would be clichéd. It is really about using the panorama format in conjunction with compelling composition. If there is a confluence of  both these variables it is possible to elevate your images to a higher aesthetic plane. The latter sadly, I have yet to achieve with the work here.

I am on a creative cusp! I am close I can feel it, Exciting!

Jack Picone

Fasten Your Seatbelt Kid, It’s Going To Be A Fast Ride

In Random Moments on September 19, 2012 at 5:45 AM

© Panorama on the Fuji X Pan 1 on Hong Kong’s Queen Rd Central by Jack Picone

Word Play: Queens Rd Central Hong Kong – in full flight. Homogeneous mirror – glass monolithic monster phallic buildings. The bold hard exchange of commodities. More. High energy and frenzied. Pervading. Exciting but overwhelming. Brand victims walking. Want. Significant and insignificant. Sharks feeding. What’s next?