Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Workshops’

Student’s Work From Kathmandu 2011

In Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on April 1, 2017 at 7:04 AM

                                                                                                  © Photograph by Kevin Cooper

This video highlights the compelling photographs authored by participants’ who took part in our last Kathmandu Workshop, July 11-16, 2011.

View video here:

The participants who took part and whose work appears on this video include:

Susie Hagon
Narendra Mainali
Kevin Cooper
Bikash
Cim Sears
Kelly Mac
Nadia Janis
Kellie Lefranchi
Matt Dole
Kate Walton

What can you do?

Our upcoming workshop in Kathmandu is:  August 28th – September 1st, 2017 .

Join us for an unforgettable experience!

For further information please contact:

Stephen Dupont stephendupont1@mac.com  and/or Jack Picone jackvpicone@gmail.com

To register contact Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.comjackvpicone@gmail.com

Music Credit: Clap Hands from Rain Dogs by Tom Waits

Kathmandu September 3rd-7th, 2017

In Workshop News on March 9, 2017 at 2:26 AM

KATHMANDU

September 3rd-7th 

2017

                                                                                                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its second roving workshop in Kathmandu. Kathmandu is one of the world’s most atmospheric cities. Even as urban chaos encroaches, this “city at the top of the world” retains its unique aura of magic, mysticism, and tradition. Over the last decade its roughly one million inhabitants, who are squeezed tightly into the Kathmandu Valley, have also been experiencing a period of major social and political turmoil – from a fierce Maoist insurgency, government curfews, and censorship to mass demonstrations against royal rule and killings of protesters. Democracy was restored in 2006 amid jubilation, and the Maoists have since joined an interim government. Today, many Nepalis believe their country has entered a new era of hope and peace.

What the Travel Guides say:

“Draped along the spine of the Himalaya, Nepal is a land of sublime scenery, time-worn temples, and some of the best hiking trails on earth. It’s a poor country, but it is rich in scenic splendor and cultural treasures. The kingdom has long exerted a pull on the Western imagination. Kathmandu is really two cities: a fabled capital of convivial pilgrims and carved rose-brick temples, and a frenetic sprawl of modern towers, mobbed by beggars and monkeys and smothered in diesel fumes. It simultaneously reeks of history and the encroaching wear and tear of the modern world.” – Lonely Planet

Workshop Overview: Award-winning documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, the acclaimed photojournalist, and filmmaker. Both Stephen and Jack will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-to-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening before the workshop’s formal start. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced before the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.)

The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop. Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style. The workshop is very project based as opposed to technically driven.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns. Interpreters can also be arranged where necessary.

Traditional Photo Essay and Multimedia: During the workshop participants will have an option to produce a completed photo essay within the documentary tradition or in a more contemporary context, a multimedia. In both cases, tutors will be on hand to guide you through the respective process.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place. This is one of our most popular workshops, so book early to avoid disappointment.

Cost: US$1,950 includes all workshops sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Kathmandu and accommodation.

To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: Jack Picone: jackvpicone@gmail.com or Stephen Dupont: stephendupont1@me.com

 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com

Stephen Dupont

http://www.contactpressimages.com/photographers/dupont/dupont_bio.html

 

Sebastiao Salgado “The World Through His Eyes,” Exhibition In Bangkok

In Photography News on February 26, 2017 at 5:16 AM

If you happen to be in Bangkok at the moment, the venerable Brazilian documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado has an exhibition at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre. It opened Feb. 9, 2017. Salgado is probably one of the most ethical and environmentally conscious contemporary photographers practicing in the world today.
The exhibition is titled “Sebastiao Salgado: The World Through His Eyes,” The expansive exhibition of 120 black-and-white images by Salgado at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre is Salgado’s first major exhibition in Thailand and will open to the public until March 8.
In parts, the work is both deeply moving and inspirational.
Paradoxically, No Photographs are allowed in the actual gallery space itself?

~Jack Picone

jackpicone_salgado_exhibition-lr-1A security guard enforces, “No Photo” dictate at  Salgado exhibition. © Photograph by Jack Picone

Siem Reap (Angkor) Workshop April 10th – 14th 2017

In Ethics, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap (Angkor) 

April 10th – 14th

Angkor Wat-faces of Bayon.

        Angkor Wat. Faces of Bayon.                                                  © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest growing town and the jumping off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

Award-winning documentary photographer and Reportage workshop founder Jack Picone (and  guest tutor to be announced)  will lead the workshop. Jack and will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

A young Muslim woman in the villiage of Loveathon. Oxfam has helped enhance the life of local residents in Loveathon like this young woman by providing fishing nets water fliters and mosquito nets.

                                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of Sunday, April 9th before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of Monday, April 10th. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening, Friday, April 14th.

Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns.

Cost: US$ 1,950. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Links: Jack Picone: http://www.jackpicone.com 

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

news_podcast_pulitzer_1969-e1431460840302

Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

Poetry and Photography

In Photography News on October 1, 2016 at 3:04 AM

Recently, I have been collaborating creatively with the poet, Kit Kelen. I have been posting photographs and Kit has been writing poems to accompany my photographs. Seeing poetry and photography collectively, as opposed to singularly is a  journey into a new creative landscape.

Over coming days I will post a small random selection of Kit’s poems. You can also visit this link and below to view Kit’s blog for this project titled 365+1. You’ll find a plethora of great poetry and art from other contributors.  

Kit Kelen – Series with Jack Picone’s Photographs – #14 – the fire at dawn, the waiting 

 14

the fire at dawn, the waiting

is it the bones show through?

is it the where-they-are waking?

so sombre silent still

as if the sky were nothing

as if they were earth already

they compose themselves

for eternity’s frame

have they fallen from great heights to here?

are they stones sprung up in flesh?

I ask because

I just don’t know

what any of this means

                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Young PNG Highlanders at the crack of dawn. Mt. Hagen, PNG.

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

Last Call for Cuba

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Dec 6th – 11th, 2015

Last chance, to register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!

Deadline for registration is Monday, Sept. 14th.unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

 

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions into modernity.

Secure a place with a  US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: US$2,650. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

 

The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP

Bangkok Weekend Photography Masterclass | Nov. 28th – 30th | 2014

In Workshop News on November 20, 2014 at 7:02 AM

General Overview of Bangkok Masterclass

by Nic Dunlop and Jack Picone

JackPicone-BKK_Masterclass-0Street photograph on Silom Road, Bangkok © by Jack Picone 

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with masterclass guest tutor Nic Dunlop , acclaimed photojournalist and filmmaker. Both Nic and Jack will work closely with participants critiquing and editing their authored work.

An introductory get-together and projection will be held on the evening of the 28th (Friday) at, The Jam Factory. Also, on the first evening and just like any working photographer, you will be given an assignment. In this case, the assignment will be a ‘Word’ to interpret as you wish.

The aim is to produce a short photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the masterclass.

Nic and Jack will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns, hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story and how to hone your personal style. The masterclass is very project based as opposed to technically driven and open to all regardless of level of photography. We explore art, travel and traditional social documentary genres.

The masterclass schedule will be challenging, fun and highly rewarding.

Date: November 28th – 30th (Friday evening to Sunday)

Location: The Jam Factory, Bangkok.

Address: 41/1-5 เจริญนคร Khlong San, Bangkok 10600

Phone: 02 861 0950

To Bring: A laptop computer. A digital camera (size and format not important). If you would like to use a cell phone camera – it is okay.

Skill Level: Open to all.

Registration: The Masterclass is strictly limited to 10 participants. Places will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

Cost: $US495.00 Includes all Masterclass sessions. Masterclass cost does not include travel costs to Bangkok and accommodation or travel insurance.

This Masterclass will be particularly popular and will fill fast, so please don’t leave making your full payment to the last minute to avoid disappointment.

For further details and/or to request a registration form please mail Jack Picone: jack@jackpicone.com and Nic Dunlop: nic@nicdunlop.com