Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Workshops’

Katoomba Photography Workshop: 8th-12th Dec. 2017.

In Photography, Workshop News on October 7, 2017 at 4:30 AM

We are taking bookings for Reportage Photography Workshops next workshop in Katoomba, Australia, 8th-12th Dec. 2017.

Update: We are happy to announce this workshop is now priced in Aus$ representing a discount of Aus$520!

Join Stephen and I (Jack) for an unforgettable experience in photography, place, and space.
         © iPhone Photograph by Jack Picone
View from a graffitied train window in the Blue Mountains en route to Katoomba. ‘Graffiti’ is based on the Italian word graffio (which means ‘scratch’).
Entrancing Katoomba is 110 kilometers west of Sydney at an altitude of 1,017 meters. It is situated in the Blue Mountains. The Blue Mountains, including Katoomba, is the traditional land of the Gundungurra people and indigenous habitation of the Blue Mountains dates from around 22,000 years ago. The name ‘Ka-toom-bah’, is thought to have emanated from local indigenous people and when translated is said to mean ‘place of many waterfalls.’
It is a popular destination for day-trippers from Sydney and international travelers both lured there by its country town main street, cafes, galleries, and antique shops. But for a photographer, Katoomba is much more than that.
Katoomba is a spiritual and visual mother lode; palpable indigenous peoples ancient history, white man’s recent history, a kaleidoscope of architecture from Federation to now. Local people, who have ‘creativity’ as an in-common gene, bewitching light, impossible mountain landscapes, old trees that reach for the sky, all of which make your heart miss a beat and ask, ‘why has it taken me so long to be here.’
Workshop Overview: This workshop is open to photographers who practice any genre and are at any level. We promote, support and are all inclusive of female photographers.
Award-winning documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, the acclaimed photographer, and filmmaker. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-to-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.
Individual and group sessions are held to dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your style. The workshop is very project based as opposed to technically driven.
The aim is to produce a photo-essay with a striking visual narrative, to be projected on the final evening of the workshop.
The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding.
Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A AUS$500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place. This will be a popular workshop; please book early to avoid disappointment.
Tuition Cost: AUS$1950
Cost includes all workshop sessions. Cost is not inclusive of travel and accommodation.
To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: Jack Picone: jack@jackpicone.com or Stephen Dupont: stephendupont1@me.com
Links:
Jack Picone
Stephen Dupont
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Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

In Photography News on July 26, 2017 at 3:58 AM

Consternation Over Winning Photograph in the Olive Cotton Award in Australia.

This is a provocative image. I surmise in amongst multiple reasons it was chosen to be the winner was to – provoke. Creativeness, diversity, innovation, and vision in photography should be without boundaries – this is without question. This photograph goes some way to pushing the creative boundaries of photography. You know ‘Space the last frontier,’ go where no man (should be woman as well) has been before stuff boundaries!

                                          © Photograph by Artist Justine Varga

Winner of the Tweed Gallery’s $20,000 Olive Cotton Prize for photographic portraiture was a controversial choice by judge Shaune Lakin [Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra]. The photograph (above) is titled ‘Maternal Line’ and is by Justine Varga.

At this point, it is useful to ask a couple of questions; the first being, does this specific photograph succeed in doing that – being stellar? The second and more pragmatic for many here is the stinging question is, is this a portrait photograph? The answer to the first question lies with the individual viewer given the inbuilt subjectivity of photography itself. There is no x+y=z answer. The second question is also difficult to answer. It is though one needs first to ask what a portrait is? A portrait is defined as a painting, drawing, photograph, or engraving of a person, especially one depicting only the face or head and shoulders. No face, head or shoulders here? Though, more broadly a portrait is a representation or impression of someone or something in language or on film or television or in this case – photography. The latter is where we enter the twilight zone. It is plausible that this photograph ‘Maternal Line’ can loosely be defined as a portrait. I think especially because as I understand it, photographer Justine Varga lovingly collaborated with her grandmother in making it. It is a ‘representation’ of her grandmother, and representation can qualify as a portrait. In a very human way, I am touched by Varga’s collaboration with her grandmother in making ‘Maternal Line .’ Saying that I wonder if the final work is as compelling as the collaboration and methodology that produced it in the first place?
As mentioned earlier within the context of those ‘go where no man (or woman of course) has been before frontiers’ of photography; curators, judges, picture editors et al. at times could be more balanced in avoiding choosing photographs that are biased towards methodology and philosophical underpinnings. Yes, the methodology and philosophical underpinnings of a photograph are paramount but not at the expense of dumbing down the aesthetic, and emotion of a photograph. Equity of both methodology and aesthetic produces the most potent and powerful photographs. Any University first-year art photography student can write a three thousand word piece on why the close-up photograph of the wine stained piece of shag pile carpet s/he has photographed is ‘art’ with intellectual and philosophical justification and authority. This is basic 101 University art photography stuff. But the important question that needs to be asked is, is it an accomplishment as an aesthetically evolved and emotionally charged photograph? Does it question us and inform us, delight us and disturb us, make us laugh or cry, extend our understanding of what it is to be human and be part of humanity? Further, still, does it emotionally wound us and remind us what it is to be alive? I wonder? Perhaps in some way it does in a ‘quite’ way or is it that ‘the story’ of the methodology is more compelling in this case?
Could it be that the aesthetic of the ‘Maternal Line’ doesn’t equal the intellectual and philosophical maturity that went into making it? Perhaps this is at the core of the consternation concerning ‘Marternal Line’ winning the Olive Cotton award?
Provocative? Clearly so but at what cost? Generally put provocation at the cost of devolving an evolved aesthetic and emotion is narrow in vision and counterintuitive. Personally, am I provoked by the actual photograph? I I am emotionally moved when considering the intamacy and emotion surrounding the story of making the photograph. But and again, provoked by the actual photograph itself? No, a flat line. I don’t ‘feel’ anything, and that is a problem.

~ JP

External Link: ABC NEWS

External Link: Sydney Morning Herald

Student’s Work From Kathmandu 2011

In Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on April 1, 2017 at 7:04 AM

                                                                                                  © Photograph by Kevin Cooper

This video highlights the compelling photographs authored by participants’ who took part in our last Kathmandu Workshop, July 11-16, 2011.

View video here:

The participants who took part and whose work appears on this video include:

Susie Hagon
Narendra Mainali
Kevin Cooper
Bikash
Cim Sears
Kelly Mac
Nadia Janis
Kellie Lefranchi
Matt Dole
Kate Walton

What can you do?

Our upcoming workshop in Kathmandu is:  August 28th – September 1st, 2017 .

Join us for an unforgettable experience!

For further information please contact:

Stephen Dupont stephendupont1@mac.com  and/or Jack Picone jackvpicone@gmail.com

To register contact Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.comjackvpicone@gmail.com

Music Credit: Clap Hands from Rain Dogs by Tom Waits

Kathmandu September 3rd-7th, 2017

In Workshop News on March 9, 2017 at 2:26 AM

KATHMANDU

September 3rd-7th 

2017

                                                                                                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its second roving workshop in Kathmandu. Kathmandu is one of the world’s most atmospheric cities. Even as urban chaos encroaches, this “city at the top of the world” retains its unique aura of magic, mysticism, and tradition. Over the last decade its roughly one million inhabitants, who are squeezed tightly into the Kathmandu Valley, have also been experiencing a period of major social and political turmoil – from a fierce Maoist insurgency, government curfews, and censorship to mass demonstrations against royal rule and killings of protesters. Democracy was restored in 2006 amid jubilation, and the Maoists have since joined an interim government. Today, many Nepalis believe their country has entered a new era of hope and peace.

What the Travel Guides say:

“Draped along the spine of the Himalaya, Nepal is a land of sublime scenery, time-worn temples, and some of the best hiking trails on earth. It’s a poor country, but it is rich in scenic splendor and cultural treasures. The kingdom has long exerted a pull on the Western imagination. Kathmandu is really two cities: a fabled capital of convivial pilgrims and carved rose-brick temples, and a frenetic sprawl of modern towers, mobbed by beggars and monkeys and smothered in diesel fumes. It simultaneously reeks of history and the encroaching wear and tear of the modern world.” – Lonely Planet

Workshop Overview: Award-winning documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, the acclaimed photojournalist, and filmmaker. Both Stephen and Jack will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-to-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening before the workshop’s formal start. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced before the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.)

The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop. Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style. The workshop is very project based as opposed to technically driven.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns. Interpreters can also be arranged where necessary.

Traditional Photo Essay and Multimedia: During the workshop participants will have an option to produce a completed photo essay within the documentary tradition or in a more contemporary context, a multimedia. In both cases, tutors will be on hand to guide you through the respective process.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place. This is one of our most popular workshops, so book early to avoid disappointment.

Cost: US$1,950 includes all workshops sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Kathmandu and accommodation.

To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: Jack Picone: jackvpicone@gmail.com or Stephen Dupont: stephendupont1@me.com

 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com

Stephen Dupont

http://www.contactpressimages.com/photographers/dupont/dupont_bio.html

 

Sebastiao Salgado “The World Through His Eyes,” Exhibition In Bangkok

In Photography News on February 26, 2017 at 5:16 AM

If you happen to be in Bangkok at the moment, the venerable Brazilian documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado has an exhibition at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre. It opened Feb. 9, 2017. Salgado is probably one of the most ethical and environmentally conscious contemporary photographers practicing in the world today.
The exhibition is titled “Sebastiao Salgado: The World Through His Eyes,” The expansive exhibition of 120 black-and-white images by Salgado at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre is Salgado’s first major exhibition in Thailand and will open to the public until March 8.
In parts, the work is both deeply moving and inspirational.
Paradoxically, No Photographs are allowed in the actual gallery space itself?

~Jack Picone

jackpicone_salgado_exhibition-lr-1A security guard enforces, “No Photo” dictate at  Salgado exhibition. © Photograph by Jack Picone

Siem Reap (Angkor) Workshop April 10th – 14th 2017

In Ethics, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap (Angkor) 

April 10th – 14th

Angkor Wat-faces of Bayon.

        Angkor Wat. Faces of Bayon.                                                  © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest growing town and the jumping off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

Award-winning documentary photographer and Reportage workshop founder Jack Picone (and  guest tutor to be announced)  will lead the workshop. Jack and will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

A young Muslim woman in the villiage of Loveathon. Oxfam has helped enhance the life of local residents in Loveathon like this young woman by providing fishing nets water fliters and mosquito nets.

                                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of Sunday, April 9th before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of Monday, April 10th. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening, Friday, April 14th.

Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns.

Cost: US$ 1,950. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Links: Jack Picone: http://www.jackpicone.com 

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

news_podcast_pulitzer_1969-e1431460840302

Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

Poetry and Photography

In Photography News on October 1, 2016 at 3:04 AM

Recently, I have been collaborating creatively with the poet, Kit Kelen. I have been posting photographs and Kit has been writing poems to accompany my photographs. Seeing poetry and photography collectively, as opposed to singularly is a  journey into a new creative landscape.

Over coming days I will post a small random selection of Kit’s poems. You can also visit this link and below to view Kit’s blog for this project titled 365+1. You’ll find a plethora of great poetry and art from other contributors.  

Kit Kelen – Series with Jack Picone’s Photographs – #14 – the fire at dawn, the waiting 

 14

the fire at dawn, the waiting

is it the bones show through?

is it the where-they-are waking?

so sombre silent still

as if the sky were nothing

as if they were earth already

they compose themselves

for eternity’s frame

have they fallen from great heights to here?

are they stones sprung up in flesh?

I ask because

I just don’t know

what any of this means

                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Young PNG Highlanders at the crack of dawn. Mt. Hagen, PNG.

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

Last Call for Cuba

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Dec 6th – 11th, 2015

Last chance, to register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!

Deadline for registration is Monday, Sept. 14th.unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

 

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions into modernity.

Secure a place with a  US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: US$2,650. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.