Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Workshops’

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

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Cuba 2018 Workshop

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

Register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions to modernity.

Secure a place with a US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic. This workshop is open to all regardless of your level of photography practice.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: A special price of US$1,850 includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Final deadline for registration is Thursday, Oct. 18th.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

 

The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP

Bangkok Weekend Photography Masterclass | Nov. 28th – 30th | 2014

In Workshop News on November 20, 2014 at 7:02 AM

General Overview of Bangkok Masterclass

by Nic Dunlop and Jack Picone

JackPicone-BKK_Masterclass-0Street photograph on Silom Road, Bangkok © by Jack Picone 

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with masterclass guest tutor Nic Dunlop , acclaimed photojournalist and filmmaker. Both Nic and Jack will work closely with participants critiquing and editing their authored work.

An introductory get-together and projection will be held on the evening of the 28th (Friday) at, The Jam Factory. Also, on the first evening and just like any working photographer, you will be given an assignment. In this case, the assignment will be a ‘Word’ to interpret as you wish.

The aim is to produce a short photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the masterclass.

Nic and Jack will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns, hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, basic camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story and how to hone your personal style. The masterclass is very project based as opposed to technically driven and open to all regardless of level of photography. We explore art, travel and traditional social documentary genres.

The masterclass schedule will be challenging, fun and highly rewarding.

Date: November 28th – 30th (Friday evening to Sunday)

Location: The Jam Factory, Bangkok.

Address: 41/1-5 เจริญนคร Khlong San, Bangkok 10600

Phone: 02 861 0950

To Bring: A laptop computer. A digital camera (size and format not important). If you would like to use a cell phone camera – it is okay.

Skill Level: Open to all.

Registration: The Masterclass is strictly limited to 10 participants. Places will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

Cost: $US495.00 Includes all Masterclass sessions. Masterclass cost does not include travel costs to Bangkok and accommodation or travel insurance.

This Masterclass will be particularly popular and will fill fast, so please don’t leave making your full payment to the last minute to avoid disappointment.

For further details and/or to request a registration form please mail Jack Picone: jack@jackpicone.com and Nic Dunlop: nic@nicdunlop.com

 

 

 

 

Chobi Mela VII January 25 to February 7, 2013

In Photography News on January 10, 2013 at 3:14 AM

Looks like a great line-up for Shahidul Alam’s Chobi Mela this year. If you are in the region or can make a bee line to get there, I highly recommend it. ~ Jack Picone

Chobi Mela VII

January 25 to February 7, 2013

Introducing the invited artists

Eugene Richards, War is PersonalGraciela Iturbide, NaturataJ. D. Okhai Ojeikere, Headgears Max Pam, Indian Ocean Journals Saori Ninomiya, From That Place, …

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Above photographs © Eugene Richards

 

Panorama | Work in Progress | 71 – Degrees

In Street Photography on December 10, 2012 at 8:22 AM

71 – Degrees | by Jack Picone

The images in this gallery have all been made on the Hasselblad X-Pan 1 and the Fuji TX-1 essentially, they are exactly the same camera just branded differently.

Both these cameras are relatively small 35mm film cameras that can produce striking unbroken images across a full 71- degree field of view (the normal field of vision of the human eye, by contrast, is only about 45 degrees). The resulting photographs make concrete the concept of the panorama — quite literally, to “see all.”

I take these cameras with me everywhere I go. They are my, “I am taking my cameras for a walk” cameras. Pictures in this slide gallery are from Bangkok, Hong Kong, Macau, Bali, South Africa, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Kathmandu, Laos, Cambodia China and Australia.

The trick with using these cameras is not to rely too heavily on the actual panorama format in an effort to make your images  more aesthetically interesting. This would be clichéd. It is really about using the panorama format in conjunction with compelling composition. If there is a confluence of  both these variables it is possible to elevate your images to a higher aesthetic plane. The latter sadly, I have yet to achieve with the work here.

I am on a creative cusp! I am close I can feel it, Exciting!

Jack Picone

I Am A Sniper by Ed Giles

In Photography News on December 9, 2012 at 3:09 AM

“The Martyrs of Truth”

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                                                                                                                                  © Photographs by Ed Giles

View this compelling (and at times chilling) report by  Ed Giles  who recently joined Syrian rebels fighting for the Free Syrian Army as they venture into Aleppo’s no-man’s land. The unit’s senior fighter Anas (who Ed’s report largely centers around) leads around 50 men, called Shuhada e-haq, or “The Martyrs of Truth”. Yet to be known, Anas will become a casualty of war. Having personally been on the receiving end of a sniper’s delivery in various conflicts, and witnessing the violence and horror of their work, Giles’ report resonates with me. This report affords a view (rarely seen) and communicates an understanding of the motivations underpinning a snipers deadly work.

Please View here:

Jack Picone

Moments

In Photography News on December 8, 2012 at 5:48 AM

If you are in HK, drop in and see the brilliant work by the Visual Studies students I taught during my AIR program in Hong Kong. They produced some absolutely compelling imagery. Also, on show is the final edit of my Thai-Burma Border documentary project ‘1200 Miles’  in both multimedia and book form.

View the ‘where and opening times’ link  here:

Just as a taste, here is Bobo Tsang image using a Lomo camera and doing a double exposure. Intriguing.

BoboTsang-001                                                                                                                            Photograph by Bobo Tsang

Picone in Prayer….

In Random Moments on August 22, 2012 at 9:20 AM

…seeking God’s forgiveness………….. but sadly, she won’t help him!        © Photograph in Luang Prabang, Laos by Meg Hewitt

Broken People by Nana Chen

In Photography News, Workshop in Motion on July 18, 2012 at 5:14 AM

© Photograph by Nana Chen

A soulful and intimate reportage concerning the challenges of health and medical care, for people in Luang Prabang, Laos.

Broken People authored by Nana Chen during The Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont Documentary Photography Workshops in Laos. View here:

Our next workshop takes place in iconic Havana, Cuba 25th Nov – 30th Nov 2012.

JP