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Posts Tagged ‘Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont Photography Workshops’

TEN MUSEUM FINE ART BLACK AND WHITE PRINTS

In Random Moments on October 10, 2014 at 3:51 AM

TEN MUSEUM FINE ART BLACK AND WHITE PRINTS: PRINTED ON FUJICOLOR CRYSTAL ARCHIVE TYPE C PAPER: BOXED AND OPEN EDITION #NEW

Introducing a collectors’ box set of 10 of my favorite photographs for lovers of fine art black-and-white photography. The images are printed on museum-quality paper and presented in a beautiful handmade box crafted from archival materials.

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The images selected from my archive span 25 years of documentary photography on four continents, and have been chosen on the basis of their aesthetic appeal to those passionate about the black-and-white medium.

The box includes:

+ 10 impeccable and beautifully printed museum-quality Type C archival prints. Signed (“en verso” in pencil), dated and embossed, and including a brief description of each individual photograph. Print size is 17 x  11 inches.

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“Nuba Mountains”, Sudan. 1994

1200 MILES LIFE AND DEATH ON THE THAI/BURMA BORDER

“Golden Horse Monastery”, Thailand. 2006
 
JackPicone-ART-BOX_SET-9     “Kayan Woman”.  Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand. 2005

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“Swallows”.  Manado Bay, Sulawesi. 2002
 
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“The Morning After”. Outback New South Wales, Australia. 2001

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“River Crossing”. Rangoon, Burma. 2013
 
 
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“Banks Of The Buriganga River”.  Dhaka, Bangladesh. 2013

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“Inclement Weather”.  Shibuya Crossing, Tokyo, Japan. 2013.

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“The Letter”. Sydney, Australia. 1999

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” Riding the Wind”. Zanzibar, Tanzania. 1997

+ Prints are archival quality in detachable cream colored mounts.

+ A certificate of authenticity.

About the Artist

Jack Picone is the recipient of several of photography’s most prestigious international awards. These include the World Press Awards, the U.S. Photographer of The Year Awards (POY), the Mother Jones/IFDP Grant for Social Documentary Photography and a UNESCO Documentary Photography Award. His work has been exhibited in major galleries and venues worldwide, including the National Portrait Gallery in Australia and at the prestigious Visa d’Or Reportage Festival in France.

For the past 25 years Picone has covered wars and major social issues in Asia, Africa and Europe. He is a co-founder of Australia’s REPORTAGE photography festival, the founder of Communiqué (a series of documentary photography workshops in Asia) and a member of the collective SOUTH. He completed a PhD in Documentary Photography at Griffith University in Queensland Australia, and lectures in photography at universities in Australia and Hong Kong.

His work is held in collections at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra, The Australian War Memorial and The State Library of New South Wales, Australia.

Picone’s training in photography was in using black and white film and mastering traditional darkroom print-making. It is a passion that has never faded thanks to the medium’s unrivalled capacity for both subtlety and drama. As legendary photographer Robert Frank expressed it in 1951: “Black and white are the colours of photography. To me they symbolise the alternatives of hope and despair to which mankind is forever subjected.”

Born in Australia, Picone is currently based in Bangkok.

Print Sales

Boxed Open Edition Fine Art Black and White Prints. Box contains 10 beautiful museum-quality prints priced at:

US$5, 495 (exclusive of shipping).

Contact

With over 30 years of knowledge and experience as a photographer, I am committed to advising and supporting anyone wishing to buy my photographs or develop a photography collection.

Contact Jack Picone on +66894880508 or jack@jackpicone.com

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Al Jazeera Magazine | War Veterans | August 2014

In Photography News on August 3, 2014 at 5:17 AM

Reflections of a war photographer.

© Words and photos by Jack Picone
jack@jackpicone.com

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I have never felt more intensely alive than I did in the moments before I was certain I was about to die.

This is how war can make you feel.

War. Even the word is ominous.

People sometimes assume that photographers go to war zones because they are adrenaline junkies. This was not the case for me. Obviously, war zones can be adrenaline-charged places, and by helping you to think clearly when faced with danger, that adrenaline can keep you alive. But my motivation for documenting war has been more layered and nuanced than a need to feed some adrenalin craving or an inclination towards voyeurism – another accusation sometimes directed at war photographers.

In my experience, people rarely do extreme things for a singular reason. And willingly entering a war zone is an extreme thing to do. My grandfather had fought in Papua New Guinea during the Second World War and I’d read extensively on the topic; all of which had helped to form the nagging question in my own mind of whether I had the resourcefulness and courage to document such events. At the time I was a staff photographer on a major daily Australian newspaper; a job I found repetitive and unchallenging. So, when the picture editor of that paper asked its 20 staff photographers whether any would be interested in covering the first Iraq War, my response was immediate. I was the only one to say ‘yes’.

But my first war proved anticlimactic as my time in Baghdad was short-lived. I was arrested by Iraqi secret police for transmitting photographs of Iraqi troops crossing the border into Kuwait, put on an empty plane and deported to Jordan.

My first ‘real’ war experience came some after, and it couldn’t have been more different. The Nagorno-Karabakh War had been raging in Armenia since the mid-1980s. I arrived in 1992, aged around 30 and ready to answer the question I’d carried around with me for years: could I keep my head, literally and metaphorically, as I documented an exchange of gunfire between warring soldiers?

I was making my way towards Armenian soldiers positioned in trenches by the side of a mountain when I got my answer. The mountain suddenly reverberated with the sound of gunfire and exploding mortar shells. Ink-blot black clouds snaked their way eerily towards the sky. A shallow hole – a perfect ready-made grave – provided my only cover from the incoming bullets and cluster bombs. I remember thinking as I lay there, that while this was too picturesque a place to be the scene of war, it was certainly a beautiful place to die.

Then I looked up and saw an Armenian soldier signal for me to run to him. His trench was only about 80m away, but that short run seemed to go on forever. I took some shrapnel in the lower back and head but I was alive. My heart pounded, adrenaline surged through my body and I felt that kind of affirming, edifying euphoria that comes with escaping death.

On reflection, I can conservatively estimate that I should have been killed at least five times over by now: once at the hands of a mob in Rwanda, another time in southern Sudan, when a Sudanese government soldier put his pistol to my temple and screamed that he was going to pull the trigger. On both occasions, only a chance intervention helped me cheat death.

I have worked in some of the most dangerous places on the planet: Angola, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, the Gaza Strip, Israel, Soviet Central Asia and the former Yugoslavia. It could be argued that most of these were unconventional wars, where armed groups and rebel factions took each other on and where it was possible for a photographer to cover both – or indeed multiple – sides of the conflict. Far from being embedded with one side or the other, as you might in Iraq or Afghanistan, a photographer in less structured conflicts can cross enemy lines, evading censorship and propaganda. But these wars also pose their own challenges – leaving you open to accusations of spying and making it much easier to ‘disappear’.

During many of the African conflicts I covered, photographers and journalists were killed at roadblocks by bored soldiers, who were often stoned, drunk or both. It’s no mystery why they were targeted. War photographers can carry more money and equipment than a rebel soldier in an underfunded rag-tag army can hope to earn in years.

Having escaped death several times, I gained a new-found confidence that I could document the ‘bang bang’, as seasoned war photographers sometimes refer to it, and stay alive. But with this came the realisation that documenting war really ought to involve more than simply photographing soldiers. What seemed exponentially more important was telling the stories of the innocent people – the children, women and elderly men – caught in its crossfire. I shifted my focus from the frontlines to the ordinary people on the edges of war.

Apart from the inbuilt danger of working in a war zone, photographing war is a philosophical, emotional, ethical and moral minefield (pun intended). On many occasions, I have found myself questioning what I was documenting. But the decision about whether or not to press the shutter has to be made in a micro-second and is fraught with responsibility.

I haven’t always made the right choice. During the famine in Somalia in 1992, I photographed an infant cradled in the arms of an aid worker. “You can stop taking pictures now Jack,” the nurse told me in her thick Irish accent. “The baby just died.” The thought that the last thing that child saw was me photographing it, has haunted me ever since. The fact that the aid agency had asked me to photograph them at work in order to help publicise the desperate plight of the Somali people offered no consolation. I was inconsolable.

A photographer has a role to play in a war zone: to bear witness, to make the invisible visible, the unheard heard and to create a visual history. For me, these tenets have acted as a filter for all but the most horrific situations I have encountered in the theatre of war. But the emotional torment often followed me home. In denial, I told myself, my friends and my family that I was unaffected by what I saw. But then the nightmares began. The emotional hangover from witnessing and documenting violence too dark to describe exacted its toll. I self-medicated with alcohol and drugs, which only worsened my problems. I still haven’t come to terms with what I’ve witnessed, but I have stopped trying to use substances to control my emotions and am instead simply trying to co-exist with the discord.

War is many things, most of them barbaric. But what disturbs me most about it is its repetitiveness: the same play, just with a new cast. That being said, nothing seems more important to me than documenting the plight of those caught up in it. Right at this very moment, human beings are frenetically killing each other in countries across the world. All we can really do is bear witness; to hold up a mirror to man’s inhumanity to man in the scant hope that future generations will succeed where we have so conclusively failed and break the cycle.

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Note: You can download the Al Jazeera App — for free — to view and read Part 1, in its entirety. I really recommend downloading the App for a dynamic experience including still image galleries, moving 3D images and brilliant layout.
Click here to download the latest issue via iTunes: aje.me/magazine and on Android devices: aje.me/ajemagazine 
Compatible with iPhone (5, 5S and 5C), Android tablets and phones.

BIO:

Jack Picone is an Australian, Bangkok-based photojournalist and documentary photographer who has been covering war zones since the early 1990s. He has travelled from the Middle East to Eastern Europe and multiple countries on the African continent documenting the fall-out from war.

Boko Haram – Kidnappers

In Ethics, Photography News on May 9, 2014 at 1:11 PM

Boko Haram 

Boko_Haram_leader__Abubakar_Shekau_916127537(Above) Leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
 
Despairingly, when you ask yourself quietly can the world get any more screwed up then it already is, then something like Boko Haram confirms – that indeed it can.
Boko Haram is holding 276 girls from a raid on a school in Chibok on 15 April and a further eight, aged between eight and 15, taken in an overnight raid from their village.
Boko Haram literal translation is – Western learning is forbidden – it is a is a Nigerian Islamist militant group made up of dispersed cells and factions mainly in the northeast of the country. There main objective to make northern Nigeria an Islamic state. What this has to do with kidnapping innocent young school girls we may never really now. Drum roll…….dut da da dut.. da da… meet (see attached pix + video) the clearly charismatic, urbane, erudite and visionary leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
What a fine specimen of manhood – a luminary. I despair.
View in full deranged rant here

Taking FujiFilm’s new X100s out for a walk

In Photography News on June 9, 2013 at 1:36 PM

Jack Picone in Myanmar, shooting with Fujifilm X100S

I have just returned from Burma (Myanmar) recently where I had the opportunity to work with FujiFilm’s new X/100s camera.

You can view a short film here made by the Bangkok based film maker Gerhard Joren.

I do collaborate with Fujifilm on various projects with their cameras.  As an aside to that stated collaboration (after shooting with the x/100 for over a week on the road in Burma) it is clear that FujiFilm have fixed the few glitches that  X/100s predecessor  (the x/100) experienced.

FujiFilm have produced a brilliant, ‘thinking outside of the box’ camera. You can view Gerhard’s Joren’s video and some of the stills I authored with the x/100s  here:

JackPicone_Burma_-Fuji-X100s-002                           ©Photograph on the FujiFilm x/100s by Jack Picone

Kathmandu Workshop July 9th – 14th 2013

In Kathmandu, Workshop News on February 27, 2013 at 3:51 AM

Kathmandu

Mourners wait for the cremation of a family member – who has passed  – Kathmandu’s holy Pashupatinath ghats. © Photograph by Jack Picone

For all enquires about our next amazing workshop event in Kathmandu July 9th – 14th email Jack Picone here: jack@jackpicone.com

Chobi Mela VII January 25 to February 7, 2013

In Photography News on January 10, 2013 at 3:14 AM

Looks like a great line-up for Shahidul Alam’s Chobi Mela this year. If you are in the region or can make a bee line to get there, I highly recommend it. ~ Jack Picone

Chobi Mela VII

January 25 to February 7, 2013

Introducing the invited artists

Eugene Richards, War is PersonalGraciela Iturbide, NaturataJ. D. Okhai Ojeikere, Headgears Max Pam, Indian Ocean Journals Saori Ninomiya, From That Place, …

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Above photographs © Eugene Richards

 

TIME Picks the Most Surprising Photos of 2012

In Photography News, Random Moments on December 25, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Interesting edit of some of the more unusual and offbeat images from 2012 by  TIME

Worth the peruse!

June 12, 2012. Fraymaris Arias, widow of Cuban boxer Teofilo Stevenson, gestures in front of the coffin containing the body of her late husband during his wake in Havana, Cuba.

Franklin Reyes—AP

Cuba Teofilo Stevenson Funeral

Panorama | Work in Progress | 71 – Degrees

In Street Photography on December 10, 2012 at 8:22 AM

71 – Degrees | by Jack Picone

The images in this gallery have all been made on the Hasselblad X-Pan 1 and the Fuji TX-1 essentially, they are exactly the same camera just branded differently.

Both these cameras are relatively small 35mm film cameras that can produce striking unbroken images across a full 71- degree field of view (the normal field of vision of the human eye, by contrast, is only about 45 degrees). The resulting photographs make concrete the concept of the panorama — quite literally, to “see all.”

I take these cameras with me everywhere I go. They are my, “I am taking my cameras for a walk” cameras. Pictures in this slide gallery are from Bangkok, Hong Kong, Macau, Bali, South Africa, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Kathmandu, Laos, Cambodia China and Australia.

The trick with using these cameras is not to rely too heavily on the actual panorama format in an effort to make your images  more aesthetically interesting. This would be clichéd. It is really about using the panorama format in conjunction with compelling composition. If there is a confluence of  both these variables it is possible to elevate your images to a higher aesthetic plane. The latter sadly, I have yet to achieve with the work here.

I am on a creative cusp! I am close I can feel it, Exciting!

Jack Picone

I Am A Sniper by Ed Giles

In Photography News on December 9, 2012 at 3:09 AM

“The Martyrs of Truth”

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View this compelling (and at times chilling) report by  Ed Giles  who recently joined Syrian rebels fighting for the Free Syrian Army as they venture into Aleppo’s no-man’s land. The unit’s senior fighter Anas (who Ed’s report largely centers around) leads around 50 men, called Shuhada e-haq, or “The Martyrs of Truth”. Yet to be known, Anas will become a casualty of war. Having personally been on the receiving end of a sniper’s delivery in various conflicts, and witnessing the violence and horror of their work, Giles’ report resonates with me. This report affords a view (rarely seen) and communicates an understanding of the motivations underpinning a snipers deadly work.

Please View here:

Jack Picone

Moments

In Photography News on December 8, 2012 at 5:48 AM

If you are in HK, drop in and see the brilliant work by the Visual Studies students I taught during my AIR program in Hong Kong. They produced some absolutely compelling imagery. Also, on show is the final edit of my Thai-Burma Border documentary project ‘1200 Miles’  in both multimedia and book form.

View the ‘where and opening times’ link  here:

Just as a taste, here is Bobo Tsang image using a Lomo camera and doing a double exposure. Intriguing.

BoboTsang-001                                                                                                                            Photograph by Bobo Tsang