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Posts Tagged ‘Cuba’

Cuba 2018 Workshop

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

Register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions to modernity.

Secure a place with a US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic. This workshop is open to all regardless of your level of photography practice.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: A special price of US$1,850 includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Final deadline for registration is Thursday, Oct. 18th.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

 

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The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP