Reportage

Posts Tagged ‘Camera’

One to One Tuition 10% discount (between 1st – 31st March, 2017 only)

In Workshop News on December 4, 2016 at 2:21 AM

One to One Tuition

10% discount (between 1st – 31st March 2017).

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One – to – one participant Sandy Edwards during her tuition in Bangkok © Photograph by Jack Picone.     

“Thank you for a wonderful, informative, learning, fun, Buddhist, photography week in Bangkok”.

~ Sandy Edwards

Join Jack Picone for one – to – one photography tuition designed to address your photographic needs! It will be an extraordinary experience!

What I teach you can’t be found on YouTube!

Tuition Costs  $US445 per day & $US335 per half day

What I teach can’t be found on YouTube

With discount: Now $US400.50 and US$301.50

 

*Discounts apply for couples and groups and for sessions five days and longer.

*Concerning cost: Cost is below my day and half day rates that I bill editorial clients as a professional photographer. I have been working in excess of thirty years as a professional photographer for the world’s leading media publications. I have a Masters in Visual Arts and  a Ph.D. in Documentary Photography.  What I impart during one-to-one tutorials cannot be found on a YouTube video. What you take away is; knowledge that you will be able to apply over and over again to your own photography, elevating the aesthetic of your authored images – hyperbolically. 

Reportage Photography Workshops tutor Jack Picone delivers one-on-one tuition to individuals and groups (up to four) in Thailand and neighboring Asian countries. One-to-one tuition is for people who are interested in fast-tracking their photographic skill and vision.

Tuition can be individually structured to accommodate photographers learning requirements.

Jack is a working photojournalist and documentary photographer with extensive experience as a photography educator.

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(Above and below) One-to-one participants at work in Bangkok’s urban slum area, Khlong Toei.

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Includes

On location shooting instruction, intensive post-shooting editing, critiquing, sequencing and basic Photoshop.

When?  

On a rolling basis 2016-2017. Book early to secure your ideal dates.

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(Above) Jeffrey Jue with local Nepalese photographer Sailendra Kharel, during a one – to – one tutorial in Kathmandu in Nepal.

Contact

To receive further information about one – to – one tuition or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com 

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for travel to Asia.

 

A Nation Continues To Mourn

In Random Moments on November 11, 2016 at 7:54 AM

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                                                                                                      Photograph by © Jack Picone

Above: A digital screen playing historical video of  King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand who died on 13 October 2016 after a long illness is reflected in rainwater near Bts Chong Nonsi, Bangkok.

The private sector has canceled all entertainment activities planned for the upcoming Loy Krathong, Christmas and New Year. Though the government has indicated that these activities can be resumed after the ending of the 30-day mourning period on November 14.

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

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Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

Poetry and Photography

In Photography News on October 1, 2016 at 3:04 AM

Recently, I have been collaborating creatively with the poet, Kit Kelen. I have been posting photographs and Kit has been writing poems to accompany my photographs. Seeing poetry and photography collectively, as opposed to singularly is a  journey into a new creative landscape.

Over coming days I will post a small random selection of Kit’s poems. You can also visit this link and below to view Kit’s blog for this project titled 365+1. You’ll find a plethora of great poetry and art from other contributors.  

Kit Kelen – Series with Jack Picone’s Photographs – #14 – the fire at dawn, the waiting 

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the fire at dawn, the waiting

is it the bones show through?

is it the where-they-are waking?

so sombre silent still

as if the sky were nothing

as if they were earth already

they compose themselves

for eternity’s frame

have they fallen from great heights to here?

are they stones sprung up in flesh?

I ask because

I just don’t know

what any of this means

                      © Photograph by Jack Picone

Young PNG Highlanders at the crack of dawn. Mt. Hagen, PNG.

Fujifilm x/100s

In Street Photography on August 13, 2016 at 7:14 AM

Even though a reasonable amount of time has eclipsed since Fujifilm launched [2013] the x/100I still find myself imbued with it. It is intuitive to use, produces technically superb files and is discreet. Here is a link to a short video of me using it while in Burma or now as it is known Myanmar.

 

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A mother cares for her son during a ferry crossing on the Irrawaddy River Yangon, Burma.                                                                                                                           

        Photograph by © Jack Picone

 

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

Reinterpretation

In Random Moments on February 27, 2016 at 4:35 AM

Interesting to see one of my iconic photographs [Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery] in a copy artists shop in central Bangkok being reinterpreted as a painting.

It is unfinished, and the artist was nowhere to be found. As a photographer, it is odd to see one of your photographs morphing into another medium. Odd — good — so far.

I am curious to enter into a dialogue with the artist and intrigued to see what it will look like when finished.

Exciting.

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        Above, work-in-progress painting of “Novice Monks, Golden Horse Monastery”.

 

 

Thai/Burma Border                                                                                                            Photograph by © Jack Picone   

        Above, the original black and white photograph made on the Thai-Burma border.

Random Street Portrait

In Random Moments on February 7, 2016 at 5:08 AM
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                                                                                         Photograph by © Jack Picone


The people you see on the way back from the launderette.‘You Need Eyes In The Back Of Your Head’.

THE GIRL ON THE POSTCARD

In Photography News on October 9, 2015 at 1:04 PM

The Girl On The Postcard – Al Jazeera Magazine.

Words and Photographs by Jack Picone.

 

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JackPicone_Kayan-LR-7                 © Photograph by Jack Picone. Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border.

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JackPicone_Kayan_LR-9               Portrait of Ma Da. Nai Soi. Thai – Burma Border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

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A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.A souvenir stall at Nai Soi village. The diagram shows how the collar bone and rib cage are pushed down by the rings to create the illusion of a long neck.  © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JP-PhD_KAYAN-LR-13This Spanish tourist took the brass ring from a Kayan woman and put it over his head. He thought it was funny and so did his friends. Few tourists who visit the village of Nai Soi really understand that it is in fact a refugee camp they are visiting and that the Kayan people they are photographing, videoing and gawking at are effectively imprisoned. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

JackPicone_Kayan_Women-LR-1A Kayan woman baths wearing her brass coil. The coil is made of heavy brass weighing around 10lbs it takes significant effort for her to support her neck as she bathes. Nai Soi, Mae Hong Son, Thailand. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.

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Reflection of Kayan woman. The small triangular mirror is used by the Kayan woman as they groom themselves. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border. © Photograph by Jack Picone.Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 6.07.10 PM

Ends.

Postscript: For accuracy sake please be aware that Ma Da, the young female subject in my earlier photographs, died in the Nai Soi camp at the age of 22 from a stomach illness caused by the insanitary conditions at the camp. Mae Hong Son, province Thai-Burma border.

HOPE | A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION by PATRICK BROWN in BANGKOK

In Photography News on September 28, 2015 at 2:45 AM

The American Photographer Lee Friedlander {b. 1934} once said he was mostly interested in photographing ‘people and things’, but it could be suggested that he expressed those interests in the depiction of places. A photograph can transport the viewer to the street corner of the town they live in, to the next city or the edge of the earth.

A photograph is created by a photographer standing in a particular place at a specific time. Amongst the many reasons for a photographer initially making the photograph one that is paramount is that the photographer wishes to ‘take the viewer there’.

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Patrick Brown’s polaroid landscapes of Australia’s ‘Never Never’ (As Indigenous Australians sometimes refer to the Outback) exhibition titled, HOPE and on show at The Jam Factory in Bangkok Sept. 17 – Oct. 17th succeeds eminently in ‘taking the viewer there’.

Brown’s dark and brooding polaroids not only ‘take the viewer there’ they also act as a kind of emotional trigger. On viewing the polaroids a yearning to travel to where Brown painstakingly made his photographs follows. The want to explore the places and understand the secret of their beauty beckons.

As with Brown’s polaroids, compelling photographs always ask more questions than they ever answer. Questions similar to, what is my relation to these vast ‘forever’ spaces? Where do I or not fit in?

What is unique about this exhibition is that Brown has answered some of the questions photographs like these often ask. He has been successful in reading the visual signifiers’ and messages thrown at him by the natural (and at times the manmade world) which is busy in an endless cycle of creation and destruction. He has given their indicators shape and context. He puts the viewer and by extension — man the protagonist — squarely ‘there’. It becomes evident that man is not just standing on the edge of these landscapes. Man is center stage. He has ideologically, historically, economically, agriculturally, spiritually interacted and finally appropriated these vast spaces. Harmony, discord, fruitfulness, barrenness, utopia and destruction amongst a myriad of others have followed. Man’s interaction is burnt into landscapes not unlike the burnt landscapes themselves documented here. Perhaps the most important question these photographs solicit from the viewer is; will man protect these spaces for future generations or exploit and destroy them as he has done since time immemorial?

Each photograph in HOPE responds to the viewer in the form of a contemplative experience and potently compels the viewer to – question everything. ~ JP