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Havana, Cuba, Photography Workshop Nov. 2018

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on July 5, 2018 at 3:03 PM

         Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

Portrait of an old woman in the old city of Havana. Cuba, December 15, 2015.

            

During a catholic ritualistic procession a woman becomes overwhelmed with emotion. Havana, Cuba, December, 2015. Tens of thousands of pilgrims meet annually on Saint Lazaro Day to pray and make offerings to Saint Lazaro.

 

On the way home from college, Havana, Cuba, 2014.

 

People waiting a taxi stop in Havna, Cuba, December 11, 2015.

 All photographs  ©  Stephen Dupont

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

We are taking bookings for our Havana, Cuba Workshop in November 2018. Invest in your photography and yourself. Our photography workshops have a reputation for extending our participants photography in a quantum way. Yes, it will be a challenging experience but you will be amongst like-minded people and it will be affirmative and fortifying every minute of every day. We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic.

This workshop is open to all regardless of your level of photography practice. We are invested in teaching all genres of photography from traditional documentary to contemporary art photography and much in-between. Stephen Dupont and I have decades of experience and can impart knowledge that an online photography course or YouTube Video is incapable of achieving.

Stephen has been making photographs like the ones above and like the photographs in  Havana Particular  in Cuba for half his life. He is immensely knowledgeable about Cuba and has an empathy and connection with local Cubans that few Westerners have achieved.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) Stephen and I critique and edit your work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions along with local Cuban photographers. The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

If you are passionate about your photography and wish to evolve your photography aesthetic than read below. Feel free to contact Stephen or me with any questions you have or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Cost: A special price of US$1,850 includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less than one month before the workshop starting date.

The final deadline for registration is Thursday, Oct. 18th.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances, workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

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Fujifilm x/100s

In Street Photography on August 13, 2016 at 7:14 AM

Even though a reasonable amount of time has eclipsed since Fujifilm launched [2013] the x/100I still find myself imbued with it. It is intuitive to use, produces technically superb files and is discreet. Here is a link to a short video of me using it while in Burma or now as it is known Myanmar.

 

JackPicone_Burma_-Fuji-X100s-002

A mother cares for her son during a ferry crossing on the Irrawaddy River Yangon, Burma.                                                                                                                           

        Photograph by © Jack Picone

 

Cuba 2018 Workshop

In Photography News, Street Photography, Workshop News on September 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Havana, Cuba Workshop: Nov. 18th – 22nd, 2018

Register for our Havana, Cuba Workshop!unnamed               © Photograph by Stephen Dupont

Don’t miss this special opportunity to join us in Havana before it all changes. This is the last opportunity to document and experience Cuba before it transitions to modernity.

Secure a place with a US$500 deposit.

We will fast track your photography authorship to a higher aesthetic. This workshop is open to all regardless of your level of photography practice.

Documentary photographer Jack Picone will work in tandem with workshop partner Stephen Dupont, acclaimed photojournalist and artist. Both Stephen and Jack will critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening prior to the workshop’s formal start in Havana. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening of the workshop.

Cost: A special price of US$1,850 includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Cuba and accommodation. A US$500 (non-refundable secures a place on the workshop) with the balance to be paid no less then one month before the workshop starting date.

Final deadline for registration is Thursday, Oct. 18th.

Application: Our workshops are strictly limited to 15 participants. Havana is a very popular workshop destination, so please do book early to avoid disappointment.

To receive further information about Havana or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com and/or stephendupont@bigpond.com

Links:

Jack Picone

http://www.jackpicone.com/

Stephen Dupont

http://www.stephendupont.com/

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Cuba workshop. Also, due to unforeseen circumstances workshop dates can be subject to change. However, this is rare.

 

The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP

Panorama | Work in Progress | 71 – Degrees

In Street Photography on December 10, 2012 at 8:22 AM

71 – Degrees | by Jack Picone

The images in this gallery have all been made on the Hasselblad X-Pan 1 and the Fuji TX-1 essentially, they are exactly the same camera just branded differently.

Both these cameras are relatively small 35mm film cameras that can produce striking unbroken images across a full 71- degree field of view (the normal field of vision of the human eye, by contrast, is only about 45 degrees). The resulting photographs make concrete the concept of the panorama — quite literally, to “see all.”

I take these cameras with me everywhere I go. They are my, “I am taking my cameras for a walk” cameras. Pictures in this slide gallery are from Bangkok, Hong Kong, Macau, Bali, South Africa, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Kathmandu, Laos, Cambodia China and Australia.

The trick with using these cameras is not to rely too heavily on the actual panorama format in an effort to make your images  more aesthetically interesting. This would be clichéd. It is really about using the panorama format in conjunction with compelling composition. If there is a confluence of  both these variables it is possible to elevate your images to a higher aesthetic plane. The latter sadly, I have yet to achieve with the work here.

I am on a creative cusp! I am close I can feel it, Exciting!

Jack Picone

Life and Death in Aleppo

In Ethics, Photography News, Street Photography on November 10, 2012 at 10:05 PM

The following events took place in ALEPPO, Syria – in September 2012

Tracey Shelton displays extraordinary courage under fire while documenting the ongoing conflict in Syria.

“On this morning, the men were relaxed and joking around as they cleaned their area from a tank attack the day before. That time, they had been prepared and the tank had fired too short. This time, the assault came with little warning”.

View Shelton’s report  here:                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                    © Tracey Shelton

Hong Kong’s Bedroom

In Street Photography on September 15, 2012 at 4:37 AM

The New Territories is sometimes referred to as Hong Kong’s bedroom. It is large – larger then Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and Lantau Island combined. A large quotient of Hong Kong’s population live in The New Territories.  What seems like, endless miles of  high-rise  housing estates – dominate the skyline. Often below these estates are thriving Hong Kong Chinese communities living out their lives in a vibrant way.

© Panorama on the Fuji X Pan 1 in The New Territories by Jack Picone

Looking At You Looking At Me

In Street Photography on August 18, 2012 at 8:54 AM

                                                                                                     © Photograph at Pattaya Beach Thailand by Jack Picone

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  JP

I AM NOT A DSLR – I AM DIFFERENT – I AM A FUJIFILM / X – PRO 1

In Photography News, Street Photography on April 23, 2012 at 8:41 AM

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I am on the Star Ferry shooting pictures at twilight while crossing Hong Kong Harbour. The sun retreated hastily and out rolled a piercing black and blue sky. Iridescent. I love this time. I love this light. A time where day transitions to night and just for a fleeting moment – it is neither. It is exciting and ambiguous. Given the consternation concerning the performance of the auto-focus of its predecessor, the x/100, I was keen to test the X Pro 1’s focusing ability.  As a photographer you are aware that you need to work in nano-seconds because light and color is on the wane and what is so beautiful now, soon will vanish. So I did work fast, two of the authored images are in this short slide show (click on post heading to see images larger if you like) above. One is the Asian girl wearing a faux polar bear head (hat) and the other is a picture where I focused on a thick translucent plastic sheet rendering a cruise liner that it framed, soft and dream like in the background. The ferry pitched from side to side in challenging low-light conditions and I took a score or two of images during the crossing from Kowloon to Hong Kong. The X-Pro 1 did not miss a beat in terms of responsiveness and the auto-focus locking onto the subject. This performance was repeated with several early morning walks photographing Hong Kong waking up to a new day as well. During my early morning wanderings I purposely sought out scenarios to make images that involved shooting through glass, against highly reflective surfaces, in shadow zones and at times in low light. This is apparent in the image of tea being poured by a waitress, shot through a heavily steamed coated window. Again, the camera did not miss a beat. It was smooth and seamless with the autofocus doing what I expect autofocus to do – focus accurately in minimal time. None of this searching searching – help me – I am lost! No whirring in and out. It focused with conviction. Similarly to the X/100, I suggest that one of the great advantages of this camera is its classically beautiful and understated retro-design. It is not (although often wanted to be) a high end DSLR. I am personally very happy that it is not a DSLR.

Said objectively, the Hong Kong Chinese are known to be just a little (it is infinitesimal really) gruff about having their picture taken but I did not encounter any negative reaction to working on the streets with this camera, in fact I was completely ignored. This camera is not great for your ego I am afraid. Get used to being ignored. If you want to make a statement swinging a house brick DSLR around your neck that in turn broadcasts that you are a photographer then this camera is probably not for you. And this is where we get to the core of what the X- Pro 1’s psychological advantage is. Because it does not solicit the unwanted reaction that comes with shooting pictures with a DSLR, I am left to document people in original moments. Sounds like visual small change but for me this is super significant in terms of access and time that otherwise may be stunted or stymied by using a DSLR.  When I am on the street with the X PRO 1 I feel a synchronicity similar to that I have enjoyed when shooting black and white film with my Leica M6. Both cameras feel like a natural extension of me. Specifically, the X PRO 1 allows me to arrive at the creative conclusion, I want.

So the proceeding is what I think is attractive and important about the X-PRO1 but there are a few fixes that Fuji could consider in their continuing evolution of this ground-breaking camera. None of the following are hugely significant and nor did they compromise me while shooting pictures on this weekend in Hong Kong. It is more about a little fine-tuning needed.

They are:

  1. The exposure compensation dial can still be in inadvertently moved to +1 or -1, -2 Stops (or similar) this needs a locking mechanism.
  2. The Q button is easily activated when not wanted. Again, this needs a rethink in terms of design. As with the exposure compensation dial above this seems to happen by simply diving into my shoulder camera bag to retrieve the camera.
  3. The clicking chatter sound as the aperture blades automatically adjust during exposure would benefit in being less audible.
  4. The 60mm F2.4 lens appears to search significantly while focusing and  in general takes longer to achieve focus.

In conclusion, similarly to the x/100, the X – Pro 1 is a result of a forward thinking Fujifilm company who have displayed significant creative courage in bringing this camera to photographers.  The things that make this an advant garde and ground – breaking camera far outweigh the few minor fixes (cited above) that need to be made. Within this context a suggestion I do have for Fuji is; instead of going the compact camera route of sales thinking/marketing i.e. pack as many features as possible into a smallish camera in an effort to be competitive in selling as many cameras to as many people as possible, perhaps this could be rethought with the idea of  reducing the X-Pro 1’s many features? Thereby edging the X-Pro 1 closer to a digital version of a Leica M4, M6 or a Voigtlander Bessa R2A. This I suggest, would be enormously attractive to professional and serious amateur photographers alike. Simplicity is still a much sought after desire. Just a thought?

The fact that Fuji have brought this hybrid camera to us from inception to reality in such a short window of time is extraordinary.

Something tells me that Leica must feel like they have had their cage rattled a little?

Fujifilm have a habit of wooing us and thrilling us. Hang on for the fast ride it is only going to get better from here.

REPUBLICA

In Street Photography, Workshop News on September 8, 2011 at 9:09 PM

Workshop participant Cim Sears has the work she authored during the Kathmandu workshop published in Nepal’s Republica. Please view Cim’s images and story on education in Nepal here.