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Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

A Small Selection Of Testimonials

In Ethics, Photography, Photography News, Workshop News on August 14, 2018 at 5:29 PM

Caption: Photoshop is “OK” but undeniable magic is experienced when a confluence of moment, aesthetic, light and emotion is delivered to the photographer in the form of a poetic photograph by the universe.

Join us in Havana for our upcoming photography workshop this November. Click here for further details.

 

Below is a small selection of testimonials from former participants who have attended Reportage Photography Workshops.

“For me, the Kathmandu workshop has been an unforgettable and very inspiring event in my life. Now after one week, looking back, I have only one word to summarize this experience: … wowww!!! It was a pleasure and honour to participate. Apart from the very professional instructions and guidance on photography from Jack and Stephen, it was amazing to discover that it is not only a great photo that counts but also the passion, vision, social/cultural involvement and messages of a great person behind all the work that was shared with us”.

Merci beaucoup!

Steven Van der Kruit

“Would I advise friends to do this workshop? YES

Would I do it again?

YES overseas to live a different experience and see a new place

Did I get out of the class what I expected?

YES, a lot more than what I expected.”

Andrea Francolini

“I had a very enjoyable time at the workshop and feel that I accomplished what I set out for – that is to hone my skills, learn new skills and become better able to take pictures of life here.  It was a wonderful experience and I think I took some of the best pictures that I have ever taken, so I’m completely chuffed”.

Luke Stephens

“Just wanted to say a big thank you to Jack for saying and insisting, “what’s your narrative about – tell me – I want to know”. To David for pushing me to explore things and persisting when I had a mini-crisis about it. To Steve for your artistic sensibility, sharing of your work and for questioning the suitcase shot. To Ed for your patience, encouragement and contemporary eyes for things. I was lucky to be part of it.”

Cim Sears

I thoroughly enjoyed the workshop experience. All four mentors offered sensitivity, encouragement and insight and were able to see the possibility of my work and push me to my strengths. Even though the critiques were casual the comments were direct and informed. After each critique, the bar was set that bit higher, as a consequence I was pushed into unfamiliar territory and subsequently into getting more interesting shots. The mantras “1 in 15” and “you don’t know until you go” keep me shooting and persisting. As a result, I built my confidence, resilience and stoked my photographic fire.

Skye

 “I have to say that I really enjoyed the week (even though it was hard work!) and felt that my photographic eye and technique improved significantly…I benefited greatly from the session with Jack and Steve in putting together my final selection for the showing on the final day – and the group praise from the panel afterwards was reassuring.”

Kieron Crawley

 ‘’I think what the Workshop is doing great is to give a different perspective to those pictures we “usually see without seeing”… and this is great and very refreshing! And also the Workshop has 100% fulfilled its expectations for me in terms of “inspiring people”! Great job!

I learnt a lot from the workshop, a totally new experience and can’t wait to go in the street taking pictures again.’’

Cecile Ducreux

 “Don’t miss the opportunity of learning photography with Jack Picone. He is a unique combination of professional photographer, local guide, and best friend. Work at your own pace. Have Jack review your images on a daily basis, discuss your shots in-depth, or shoot eight hours a day. He will let you know what to look for in a scene and be able to gain access into intimate situations. Jack is a photojournalist on a Magnum and National Geographic level with a passion for teaching. Take your photography to the next level and enjoy a memorable travel experience too.”

Jeffrey Jue

“Without a doubt the most inspiring six days I’ve ever experienced. I was inspired to develop my own style and to follow what I believe to be true to me, and more importantly, to go out and have fun! Thanks again for a fantastic six days. I went out to Kings Cross and I’m confident I’ve taken some of my best shots for my project immediately following the workshop… oh! and I’m shooting in film now. That’s how influential Jack, Stephen was, to the point of experimenting with a different medium”.

Ian Flanders

“The Reportage Photography Workshop” was an extremely valuable experience. It was an immense help to me to hear Jack and Steve both talk about their work, the changing world of photojournalism, and what it takes to be a photographer in this day and age. Not only that but their expert advice in relation to photographic techniques, equipment and critique was immensely beneficial. It was also a great opportunity to meet other talented photographers during the workshop. I highly recommend this workshop to anyone with the desire to extend their documentary/photojournalism photography. It was a very inspiring few days.”

Zoe Morley

 I attended the Sydney Workshop even though I don’t necessarily want to specialise in photojournalism. I found that the learning was applicable across all photographic disciplines. I came away with more knowledge and confidence about framing, composition and storytelling – what makes a great shot. But possibly the greatest thing I took away from the workshops was inspiration. To hear the stories and see the pictures made by world-class photographers like Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont renewed my energy to shoot and my passion for photography. The range of other presentations from legends of the industry like Tim Page and others only value-added and widened the appeal and scope for me. I found Picone and Dupont to be frank and honest in their critique of my work and yet sufficiently gentle in their suggestions and friendly nature not to crush my spirit.  I’ve found it very difficult to get honest and considered feedback on my photography over the years – but I found it at the workshops. I would encourage anyone who was thinking about attending one of their workshops to do so.  The more you put into it, the more you’ll get back.”

Tim Anger

 “This was an excellent workshop, with some outstanding international photographers coming in to show us their work, and to tell us their story. It was very inspiring. For me the best part was absolutely the critique of the images being taken, as it is very hard to get good honest critique, and to have the photos that you have just taken really given a working over was a very good experience and offered good insight into what other people are looking at and experiencing with the photos. The theme of photographing ‘Hope’ was also very interesting, as this was the first time I had been given such an assignment, and it was very helpful to see the thought processes that I went through.

“At 21 I was probably the youngest person in the workshop, possibly with the least experience, but this was no barrier; everyone was equal, everyone has constructive criticism, everyone had a story to tell, it was really lovely being in such a group. Given the opportunity, I would not hesitate to recommend this on to others, or to participate in the workshop again.”

Mitchell Mathieson

“The workshop was a chance to get up close and personal with two (Picone and Dupont) outstanding members of the professional photographic community as well as the guest presenters who were all amazing in their own right. I especially enjoyed the opportunity to meet, discuss and interact with the other students in an open forum. I will be using my experience as a foundation for my photographic style which will no doubt benefit from the valuable guidance I received”.

David Gross

 “I shot a lot of photos and I gained enormous insight into the editing process in regard to how to tell various stories from the one body of work. I also greatly appreciated the guidance in refining my shooting techniques. The relaxed environment was surprisingly conducive to learning and the opportunity to listen in on critique sessions of other participants was particularly insightful”.

Trish Macris

“For me, the Sydney workshop was really valuable, not only in the obvious ways but also in the quiet moments of conversation, discussions and image reviews.  Spending time with photographers actually successful in their vocation was something that made it all very tangible. It was truly valuable to see portfolios of work by high quality, significant photographers and their personal commentary as they presented their own work…  Stephen’s work on PNG and increasing focus on the anthropological aspect of his art,  Jack’s work on the Thai-Burma border and pearls of wisdom throughout the week, Tim Page’s extraordinary body of work during the Vietnam war, and documenting the impact of agent orange since then.  I found the reviews of my own work and the work of my colleagues really helpful. Tim Page’s brutally frank reviews were really helpful and an eye-opener.  Jack’s thoughtful insight into what makes a good and interesting photograph resonated deeply.  Stephen’s eye and holistic view when it came to image selection, editing and presentation were excellent.  I came away with a great appreciation and respect for the photographers we spent time with and more clarity for my own path ahead.”

Kate Baker

‘I learned a lot. The shooting assignment was a brilliant idea… scary, but brilliant. Not only did it provide a platform to be critiqued by Jack and Steve, but I personally felt really encouraged to push myself. I found Jack and Steve’s passion for photography, encouragement and aiming for excellence very contagious. Having additional visiting photographers share their stories as well as just being really inspired by the creative energy of the other participants in the workshop all around made for a great week. I think I was on a high all week… I thoroughly recommend it!!’

“A”

 ~ ends

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Workshop In Motion – Upcoming Sept. 3rd-7th, 2017 Workshop in Kathmandu, Nepal.

In Ethics, Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion on March 31, 2017 at 10:36 AM

Stephen Dupont and Jack Picone give an overview of what to expect on our upcoming Sept. 2017 in Kathmandu, Nepal.                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

A young deceased woman (above) is carried to the burning ghats by family members at Pashupatinath Temple, Kathmandu.

View the short video here and be transported to the kaleidoscopic streets of Nepal.

~ Jack Picone

 

Siem Reap (Angkor) Workshop April 10th – 14th 2017

In Ethics, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap (Angkor) 

April 10th – 14th

Angkor Wat-faces of Bayon.

        Angkor Wat. Faces of Bayon.                                                  © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest growing town and the jumping off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

Award-winning documentary photographer and Reportage workshop founder Jack Picone (and  guest tutor to be announced)  will lead the workshop. Jack and will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

A young Muslim woman in the villiage of Loveathon. Oxfam has helped enhance the life of local residents in Loveathon like this young woman by providing fishing nets water fliters and mosquito nets.

                                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of Sunday, April 9th before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of Monday, April 10th. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening, Friday, April 14th.

Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns.

Cost: US$ 1,950. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Links: Jack Picone: http://www.jackpicone.com 

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

news_podcast_pulitzer_1969-e1431460840302

Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP

Boko Haram – Kidnappers

In Ethics, Photography News on May 9, 2014 at 1:11 PM

Boko Haram 

Boko_Haram_leader__Abubakar_Shekau_916127537(Above) Leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
 
Despairingly, when you ask yourself quietly can the world get any more screwed up then it already is, then something like Boko Haram confirms – that indeed it can.
Boko Haram is holding 276 girls from a raid on a school in Chibok on 15 April and a further eight, aged between eight and 15, taken in an overnight raid from their village.
Boko Haram literal translation is – Western learning is forbidden – it is a is a Nigerian Islamist militant group made up of dispersed cells and factions mainly in the northeast of the country. There main objective to make northern Nigeria an Islamic state. What this has to do with kidnapping innocent young school girls we may never really now. Drum roll…….dut da da dut.. da da… meet (see attached pix + video) the clearly charismatic, urbane, erudite and visionary leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
What a fine specimen of manhood – a luminary. I despair.
View in full deranged rant here

Life and Death in Aleppo

In Ethics, Photography News, Street Photography on November 10, 2012 at 10:05 PM

The following events took place in ALEPPO, Syria – in September 2012

Tracey Shelton displays extraordinary courage under fire while documenting the ongoing conflict in Syria.

“On this morning, the men were relaxed and joking around as they cleaned their area from a tank attack the day before. That time, they had been prepared and the tank had fired too short. This time, the assault came with little warning”.

View Shelton’s report  here:                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                    © Tracey Shelton

Funfair Comes To Town – Luang Prabang, Laos

In Ethics, Workshop News on July 16, 2012 at 8:09 AM

 © Photograph by Gary Jones. In pursuit of a prize. Novice monks with air rifles at Luang Prabang Funfair.

The Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont Documentary Photography workshops participant Gary Jones documents a small funfair that arrives to town. Luang Prabang, Laos. View here:

Drowning In Their Own Hubris?

In Ethics on January 29, 2012 at 2:33 PM

I agree with much of what Greene says in this interview with  PHOTO RAW  but I think his vitriol about some forms of digital technology is rather extreme. Does using film, digital or even apps (clearly my personal bias is B+W film) in post production really matter? With post production and using apps, the norm is that if the image (if used within a journalism context) is manipulated to a point of altering the content/composition then this needs to be stated clearly in the credit e.g. Photo Illustration by….

Cameras are just tools, it is about a photographers vision – is it not?  Whether a photographer uses a disposable camera (yes, you can still buy them) or a state of the art high-end digital camera is not the issue.

There is enough room in the world for shooting on an iPhone or on a 10×8 Polaroid camera or any other camera you can dream up. Such is the richness and diversity of photography. Genre fascists reduce the world we work in – creatively.

The ugly argument going on in most of this FB dialogue (read it if you are game) is negative and unconstructive.

Are the participants (apart from the few who have made reasonable comments ) in this FB dialogue drowning in their own hubris?

Do they have a one dimensional view of photography and themselves?

Whatever happened to the notion that photography is about the subject, social issues and story telling?

JP