Reportage

Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

Workshop In Motion – Upcoming Sept. 3rd-7th, 2017 Workshop in Kathmandu, Nepal.

In Ethics, Kathmandu, Workshop in Motion on March 31, 2017 at 10:36 AM

Stephen Dupont and Jack Picone give an overview of what to expect on our upcoming Sept. 2017 in Kathmandu, Nepal.                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

A young deceased woman (above) is carried to the burning ghats by family members at Pashupatinath Temple, Kathmandu.

View the short video here and be transported to the kaleidoscopic streets of Nepal.

~ Jack Picone

 

Siem Reap (Angkor) Workshop April 10th – 14th 2017

In Ethics, Workshop in Motion, Workshop News on January 20, 2017 at 3:30 PM

Siem Reap (Angkor) 

April 10th – 14th

Angkor Wat-faces of Bayon.

        Angkor Wat. Faces of Bayon.                                                  © Photograph by Jack Picone

Reportage Photography Workshops will hold its next roving workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia’s fastest growing town and the jumping off point for the spectacular temple ruins of Angkor. With a maximum of 12 participants, the 5-day event will provide an opportunity to explore the cultural riches and social dynamism of this exotic corner of the world.

Award-winning documentary photographer and Reportage workshop founder Jack Picone (and  guest tutor to be announced)  will lead the workshop. Jack and will be there to critique and edit participants’ work one-on-one, and also take part in evening projections and discussions.

With the world’s most breathtaking ancient ruins on its doorstep, Siem Reap and surrounding areas offer endless photographic possibilities. The town itself has gone from backwater to boomtown in the space of a decade, and traditional Khmer culture coexists with the emergence of a new, hip generation of Cambodians. As well as the vast temple complex of Angkor, nearby are floating villages with traditional stilted houses, the rural beauty of Tonle Sap Lake and the flooded forest of Komplong Phhluk.

A young Muslim woman in the villiage of Loveathon. Oxfam has helped enhance the life of local residents in Loveathon like this young woman by providing fishing nets water fliters and mosquito nets.

                                                                                                               © Photograph by Jack Picone

An introductory get-together will be held on the evening of Sunday, April 9th before the workshop’s formal start on the morning of Monday, April 10th. Like any working documentary photographer, you will be given an assignment brief to interpret as you wish. (The brief will be announced prior to the workshop to give you time to research possible subjects before you arrive.) The aim is to produce a documentary photo essay with a striking visual narrative, to be shown on the final evening, Friday, April 14th.

Tutors will hold individual and group sessions to supervise and edit the assignments, and dialogue intensively on topics such as photographic composition, portraiture, advanced camera techniques, how to research ideas and tell an original story, how to market a body of work, and how to hone your personal style.

The workshop’s schedule will be demanding but highly rewarding. Tutors and field assistants will be on hand constantly to help navigate any areas of difficulty and discuss all your photographic concerns.

Cost: US$ 1,950. Includes all workshop sessions. Workshop cost does not include travel costs to Siem Reap and accommodation.

Application: The workshop is strictly limited to 12 participants. A $500 deposit will be required at the time of booking to secure a place.

Please Note: We advise that all participants take out medical/travel insurance for the Siem Reap workshop. To receive further information or to request a registration form, please contact: jack@jackpicone.com

Links: Jack Picone: http://www.jackpicone.com 

A Near Perfect Encapsulation For What a ‘Good Picture’ Should Do.

In Ethics on November 5, 2016 at 12:19 PM

“If it makes you laugh, if it makes you cry, if it rips out your heart, that’s a good picture” ~ Eddie Adams

news_podcast_pulitzer_1969-e1431460840302

Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan (above), chief of the South Vietnamese national police, firing his pistol into the head of a Vietcong prisoner, Nguyen Van Lem, on a Saigon street during the Tet offensive on Feb. 1, 1968. (Eddie Adams/Associated Press)

PHOTOGRAPHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A combat photographer since the Korean War, Eddie Adams joined the Associated Press team in Vietnam in 1965. He became famous for his 1968 photograph of Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of South Vietnam’s national police, shooting a Viet Cong prisoner in the head. Adams later regretted the picture’s notoriety, preferring to be remembered for his images of Vietnamese refugees after the war.

Adams’s time covering the war and the searing photograph above marks fifty years since the start of America’s first televised war and is symbolic of how dramatic stories authored by photojournalists and journalists brought news about the war to the rest of the world.

When The River Runs Dry

In Ethics, Random Moments on March 7, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Twenty years ago, Jack Picone photographed Nancy just after she was beaten. He wonders what has changed since.

JackPicone-AboriginalWoman-LR-0Nancy was bright and engaging. We spoke about the things that connected us – our family, friends and where we came from [Jack Picone/Al Jazeera]

The heat was oppressive and crushing; the kind that has claimed countless lives in Australia’s dead heart...read more

The Controversial Mr Gilden

In Ethics, Street Photography on August 15, 2015 at 5:43 AM
Gilden has always been a controversial figure.
Vice Magazine recently published Gilden’s photoessay titled ‘Two Days in Appalachia’. Controversy followed the publication of Gilden’s photographs and Gilden’s modus operandi is yet again under question.
PhotoShelter’s Allen Murabayashi has published an interesting piece at PhotoShelter Blog that encapsulates all the protagonists involved  in the ongoing controversy.
Gilden’s work has always had an element of  ‘does the end justified the means’?
His work is raw and unforgiving not unlike the man himself.
Roger May’s questions if Gilden has empathy or indeed if that his work has a complete absence of empathy – is a good one. I hear some empathy in Gilden’s rhetoric in the way he speaks about the people people he photographs during the short film linked in the interview. Observing Gilden photographing on the streets of NY, I see him range from zero empathy and peak at a modicum of empathy. At one point he is telling a passing woman to put her scarf on so she won’t get cold then almost in the same breath commenting on another woman’s boots as “fucking ugly”. In part this displayed empathy or lack of it could be attributed to the random task at hand – street photography.
two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-600-1435773723-size_1000Harlan, Kentucky, Saturday, June 6. Destiny, Amber, and Serenity at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival.
© Photograph by Bruce Gilden 
I think the comments (in the comments section below the Vice interview)​ from r​etired Social Worker Sharon Hurley a native Appalachian are incredibly insightful. They remind us all as photographers about how credible or not our documentation of people can and isn’t once our pictures are published.​ Sharon says, “His work is not reflective of the softness and peacefulness of life but of the harshness. Technically, his work is excellent and evokes reaction. Obviously, he does not care that the images he presents is not representative of an entire community whether it is in Japan, Detriot , London or Appalachia​”​.

two-days-in-appalachia-0000687-v22n7-765-1435773764-size_1000Saturday, June 6. Tammy at the Harlan County Poke Sallet Festival. © Photograph by Bruce Gilden

​Back to the video featuring Gilden: Gilden is heard saying that he finds some of his photographs beautiful. Further that if he didn’t photograph these people they would go unnoticed. Indeed, he recounts a conversation with one of the women he has photographed in the most unforgiving way. He says that she says (after he shows her the photograph he made of her) that she thinks he made her look beautiful in the photograph.
So is his work devoid of empathy? As always the question is both complicated and subjective.
And within the preceding context of complexity and subjectivity — personally — I questioned whether Gilden’s photographs leave the people he has photographed with their dignity uncompromised? Of course, dignity is also a complex and highly subjective notion. Though and said objectively most people are innately aware when they have not treated another person with requisite respect.
Interestingly, dignity and empathy are at times interconnected. It could be suggested that it is difficult to leave the people one has photographed with their dignity intact without first showing them empathy.
~JP

Boko Haram – Kidnappers

In Ethics, Photography News on May 9, 2014 at 1:11 PM

Boko Haram 

Boko_Haram_leader__Abubakar_Shekau_916127537(Above) Leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
 
Despairingly, when you ask yourself quietly can the world get any more screwed up then it already is, then something like Boko Haram confirms – that indeed it can.
Boko Haram is holding 276 girls from a raid on a school in Chibok on 15 April and a further eight, aged between eight and 15, taken in an overnight raid from their village.
Boko Haram literal translation is – Western learning is forbidden – it is a is a Nigerian Islamist militant group made up of dispersed cells and factions mainly in the northeast of the country. There main objective to make northern Nigeria an Islamic state. What this has to do with kidnapping innocent young school girls we may never really now. Drum roll…….dut da da dut.. da da… meet (see attached pix + video) the clearly charismatic, urbane, erudite and visionary leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau, gloatingly threatening to sell the girls as “slaves”.
What a fine specimen of manhood – a luminary. I despair.
View in full deranged rant here

Life and Death in Aleppo

In Ethics, Photography News, Street Photography on November 10, 2012 at 10:05 PM

The following events took place in ALEPPO, Syria – in September 2012

Tracey Shelton displays extraordinary courage under fire while documenting the ongoing conflict in Syria.

“On this morning, the men were relaxed and joking around as they cleaned their area from a tank attack the day before. That time, they had been prepared and the tank had fired too short. This time, the assault came with little warning”.

View Shelton’s report  here:                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                    © Tracey Shelton

Funfair Comes To Town – Luang Prabang, Laos

In Ethics, Workshop News on July 16, 2012 at 8:09 AM

 © Photograph by Gary Jones. In pursuit of a prize. Novice monks with air rifles at Luang Prabang Funfair.

The Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont Documentary Photography workshops participant Gary Jones documents a small funfair that arrives to town. Luang Prabang, Laos. View here:

Drowning In Their Own Hubris?

In Ethics on January 29, 2012 at 2:33 PM

I agree with much of what Greene says in this interview with  PHOTO RAW  but I think his vitriol about some forms of digital technology is rather extreme. Does using film, digital or even apps (clearly my personal bias is B+W film) in post production really matter? With post production and using apps, the norm is that if the image (if used within a journalism context) is manipulated to a point of altering the content/composition then this needs to be stated clearly in the credit e.g. Photo Illustration by….

Cameras are just tools, it is about a photographers vision – is it not?  Whether a photographer uses a disposable camera (yes, you can still buy them) or a state of the art high-end digital camera is not the issue.

There is enough room in the world for shooting on an iPhone or on a 10×8 Polaroid camera or any other camera you can dream up. Such is the richness and diversity of photography. Genre fascists reduce the world we work in – creatively.

The ugly argument going on in most of this FB dialogue (read it if you are game) is negative and unconstructive.

Are the participants (apart from the few who have made reasonable comments ) in this FB dialogue drowning in their own hubris?

Do they have a one dimensional view of photography and themselves?

Whatever happened to the notion that photography is about the subject, social issues and story telling?

JP

Hacked

In Ethics, Photography News on December 3, 2011 at 7:01 AM

Sadly, The Jack Picone and Stephen Dupont Documentary Workshops site has been ‘Hacked’.

A raft of marketing material that has nothing to do with the workshops is being posted there.

We are working on returning the site to its previous state.

Thanks,

 

Jack